Symptom Presentation And Delay In Seeking Care For Women And Men With Myocardial Infarction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163813
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Presentation And Delay In Seeking Care For Women And Men With Myocardial Infarction
Author(s):
King, K.
Author Details:
K. King, University of Rochester, School of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA, email: kathleen_king@urmc.rochester.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine symptom presentation, delay in seeking care, and expectations about the experience of having a myocardial infarction (MI) comparing women and men. The Common Sense Model of Illness Representation was the theoretical framework used to structure the study. Using a structured interview, 30 women and 30 men hospitalized after a MI were asked to describe their presenting symptoms in detail. In addition, they were asked if their symptoms matched their expectations of a MI. Results: Discomfort in the center of the chest was the singular predominant symptom reported by men (90% vs 57% in women, p = .004). In contrast, there was no one predominant symptom reported by women: 57% reported discomfort in the center of the chest, 53% in the right shoulder (vs 13% in men, p = .001), 50% in the left arm (vs 47% in men, p = .80), and 47% in the left shoulder (vs 27% in men, p = .11). Mean discomfort ratings did not differ between women and men (6.8 vs 7.6, p = .35). Discomfort, pain, pressure, tightness, heaviness or a dull ache were the most common descriptors of the quality of symptoms for both women and men. There were no gender differences in reporting of associated symptoms such as fatigue and shortness of breath. The percent of women (57%) and men (60%) who arrived at the emergency department (ED) within 3 hours of onset of symptoms was not different (p = .79). The majority of women and men (73% and 67%, p = .35) reported that their symptoms were different from what they expected a MI to be like. Most (62%) stated that their pain was less than expected and 38% said that the location of their symptoms was different than expected. Pain scores did not differ comparing subjects who reported a match between their symptoms and expectations (8.1), subjects who reported their pain to be less than expected (6.2), and subjects whose symptom location was different than expected (7.8; F = 2.5, p = .10). There was no difference in the mean scores for pain comparing subjects who arrived in ED < 3 hours after the onset of symptoms versus those who delayed > 3 hours (7.4 vs 6.9, p = .51). However, a higher percent of subjects who reported that their symptoms were different from expected delayed in seeking care and arrived at ED > 3 hours after onset of symptoms than subjects reporting a match between symptoms and expectations (50% vs 22%, p = .04). Conclusions: While a few gender differences in symptom presentation were found, women were no more likely to delay seeking care than men. However, for both women and men, a mismatch between symptoms experienced and symptoms expected was related to delay. These results support the tenets of the Common Sense Model in demonstrating that symptom interpretation is important in the decision to seek care. These data can be used to structure information that can help individuals interpret their symptoms and decrease the time it takes to seek care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Presentation And Delay In Seeking Care For Women And Men With Myocardial Infarctionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKing, K.en_US
dc.author.detailsK. King, University of Rochester, School of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA, email: kathleen_king@urmc.rochester.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163813-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this descriptive study was to examine symptom presentation, delay in seeking care, and expectations about the experience of having a myocardial infarction (MI) comparing women and men. The Common Sense Model of Illness Representation was the theoretical framework used to structure the study. Using a structured interview, 30 women and 30 men hospitalized after a MI were asked to describe their presenting symptoms in detail. In addition, they were asked if their symptoms matched their expectations of a MI. Results: Discomfort in the center of the chest was the singular predominant symptom reported by men (90% vs 57% in women, p = .004). In contrast, there was no one predominant symptom reported by women: 57% reported discomfort in the center of the chest, 53% in the right shoulder (vs 13% in men, p = .001), 50% in the left arm (vs 47% in men, p = .80), and 47% in the left shoulder (vs 27% in men, p = .11). Mean discomfort ratings did not differ between women and men (6.8 vs 7.6, p = .35). Discomfort, pain, pressure, tightness, heaviness or a dull ache were the most common descriptors of the quality of symptoms for both women and men. There were no gender differences in reporting of associated symptoms such as fatigue and shortness of breath. The percent of women (57%) and men (60%) who arrived at the emergency department (ED) within 3 hours of onset of symptoms was not different (p = .79). The majority of women and men (73% and 67%, p = .35) reported that their symptoms were different from what they expected a MI to be like. Most (62%) stated that their pain was less than expected and 38% said that the location of their symptoms was different than expected. Pain scores did not differ comparing subjects who reported a match between their symptoms and expectations (8.1), subjects who reported their pain to be less than expected (6.2), and subjects whose symptom location was different than expected (7.8; F = 2.5, p = .10). There was no difference in the mean scores for pain comparing subjects who arrived in ED < 3 hours after the onset of symptoms versus those who delayed > 3 hours (7.4 vs 6.9, p = .51). However, a higher percent of subjects who reported that their symptoms were different from expected delayed in seeking care and arrived at ED > 3 hours after onset of symptoms than subjects reporting a match between symptoms and expectations (50% vs 22%, p = .04). Conclusions: While a few gender differences in symptom presentation were found, women were no more likely to delay seeking care than men. However, for both women and men, a mismatch between symptoms experienced and symptoms expected was related to delay. These results support the tenets of the Common Sense Model in demonstrating that symptom interpretation is important in the decision to seek care. These data can be used to structure information that can help individuals interpret their symptoms and decrease the time it takes to seek care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:17Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.