2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163814
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Atrial Fibrillation After Cardiac Surgery
Author(s):
Funk, Marjorie
Author Details:
Marjorie Funk, PhD, Associate Professor, Yale University, School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: marjorie.funk@yale.edu
Abstract:
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common dysrhythmia after cardiac surgery and is a major cause of morbidity and increased cost. With shortened length of stay, the occurrence of AF after discharge is not known. Purpose: To examine the incidence, timing, symptoms, and predictors of AF after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and valve surgery. Methods: In this prospective longitudinal study, 302 subjects who had undergone CABG or valve surgery at a 900-bed urban medical center between June 1998 and December 1999 were enrolled. Subjects were continuously monitored for AF with standard hardwire and telemetry monitoring while in the hospital and with wearable cardiac event recorders for 2 weeks following discharge. After discharge, patients recorded and transmitted their rhythm transtelephonically to a member of the research team once a day and whenever they had symptoms suggestive of AF. Exclusion criteria included not speaking or understanding English, lack of access to a touch-tone telephone, a post-operative length of stay > 2 weeks, and chronic AF. Results: The sample was 72.9% male and 94.4% white, with a mean age of 63.6?10.8 years (range: 24 - 91 years). Of the 302 subjects, 127 (42.1%) had AF; 41 had AF after discharge and for 10 it was their first episode. The first episode of AF occurred at a mean of 2.9?3.1 days post-op (range: day of surgery - 21 days after surgery). Although palpitations was the most common symptom (16.8%), a majority (68.8%) of AF episodes were not associated with symptoms. Independent predictors of AF by logistic regression analysis were age ? 65 (OR = 2.6, 95%CI = 1.5-4.3, p< .001); history of intermittent AF (OR = 5.6, 95%CI = 2.0-15.4, p=.001); atrial pacing (OR = 2.8, 95%CI = 1.5-5.1, p=.001); male sex (OR = 2.2, 95%CI = 1.2-4.0, p=.015); white race (OR = 5.7, 95%CI = 1.2-27.8, p=.030); and valve surgery (OR = 2.0, 95%CI = 1.0-3.9, p=.040). Conclusions and Implications for Practice: AF is common after cardiac surgery and often occurs after discharge and without accompanying symptoms. Out-patient monitoring may be warranted in patients with demographic and clinical characteristics that place them at increased risk for AF.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAtrial Fibrillation After Cardiac Surgeryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFunk, Marjorieen_US
dc.author.detailsMarjorie Funk, PhD, Associate Professor, Yale University, School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: marjorie.funk@yale.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163814-
dc.description.abstractAtrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common dysrhythmia after cardiac surgery and is a major cause of morbidity and increased cost. With shortened length of stay, the occurrence of AF after discharge is not known. Purpose: To examine the incidence, timing, symptoms, and predictors of AF after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and valve surgery. Methods: In this prospective longitudinal study, 302 subjects who had undergone CABG or valve surgery at a 900-bed urban medical center between June 1998 and December 1999 were enrolled. Subjects were continuously monitored for AF with standard hardwire and telemetry monitoring while in the hospital and with wearable cardiac event recorders for 2 weeks following discharge. After discharge, patients recorded and transmitted their rhythm transtelephonically to a member of the research team once a day and whenever they had symptoms suggestive of AF. Exclusion criteria included not speaking or understanding English, lack of access to a touch-tone telephone, a post-operative length of stay > 2 weeks, and chronic AF. Results: The sample was 72.9% male and 94.4% white, with a mean age of 63.6?10.8 years (range: 24 - 91 years). Of the 302 subjects, 127 (42.1%) had AF; 41 had AF after discharge and for 10 it was their first episode. The first episode of AF occurred at a mean of 2.9?3.1 days post-op (range: day of surgery - 21 days after surgery). Although palpitations was the most common symptom (16.8%), a majority (68.8%) of AF episodes were not associated with symptoms. Independent predictors of AF by logistic regression analysis were age ? 65 (OR = 2.6, 95%CI = 1.5-4.3, p< .001); history of intermittent AF (OR = 5.6, 95%CI = 2.0-15.4, p=.001); atrial pacing (OR = 2.8, 95%CI = 1.5-5.1, p=.001); male sex (OR = 2.2, 95%CI = 1.2-4.0, p=.015); white race (OR = 5.7, 95%CI = 1.2-27.8, p=.030); and valve surgery (OR = 2.0, 95%CI = 1.0-3.9, p=.040). Conclusions and Implications for Practice: AF is common after cardiac surgery and often occurs after discharge and without accompanying symptoms. Out-patient monitoring may be warranted in patients with demographic and clinical characteristics that place them at increased risk for AF.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:18Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.