Perceptions Of Instructor Caring Behaviors, Self-Esteem, And Perceived Clinical Competence: A Model Of The Attitudinal Component Of Professional Nurse Autonomy In Female Baccalaureate Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163815
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions Of Instructor Caring Behaviors, Self-Esteem, And Perceived Clinical Competence: A Model Of The Attitudinal Component Of Professional Nurse Autonomy In Female Baccalaureate Nursing Students
Author(s):
Wade, G.
Author Details:
G. Wade, University of Delaware, Department of Nursing, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: ghwade@udel.edu
Abstract:
Professional nurse autonomy, an essential attribute for achieving full professional status, has been a goal of nursing for over 50 years. A precursor to the exercise of professional nurse autonomy, valuation of autonomy, should be inculcated during the nursing education process. The purpose of this study was to predict a model of the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy based on Watson's Theory of Transpersonal Caring. A secondary aim was to test three carative factors embedded in Watson's theory. Using a model testing correlational design, female nursing students' perceptions of instructor caring behaviors, self-esteem and perceived clinical competence were hypothesized as predictors of the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy. Senior baccalaureate nursing students (N = 317) from 20 NLN accredited baccalaureate nursing programs, selected by quota sampling, responded to the study questionnaires. Entry of each of the three predictors using hierarchical multiple regression revealed that self-esteem, and to a lesser degree, perceived clinical competence explained 11.2% of the variance in the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy. The initial model, subjected to path analysis, was just-identified and could not be tested. After trimming paths that were not statistically significant, the resulting over-identified model fit the data ((2 = 2.77, p = .25). Perceptions of instructor caring behaviors and self-esteem explained 18% of the variance in perceived clinical competence. Perceptions of instructor caring behaviors, self-esteem and perceived clinical competence, however, only explained 10.9% of the variance in the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy. Although these findings provide a baseline for understanding the development of professional nurse autonomy, a large percentage of the variance in the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy was unexplained. Findings suggested the need for an instrument to specifically measure instructor caring behaviors relative to Watson's theory. Further study of perceived clinical competence and self-esteem as predictors of the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy is warranted. This study, however, linked the caring focus of nursing to the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy and extended the body of knowledge on caring in nursing and education.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions Of Instructor Caring Behaviors, Self-Esteem, And Perceived Clinical Competence: A Model Of The Attitudinal Component Of Professional Nurse Autonomy In Female Baccalaureate Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWade, G.en_US
dc.author.detailsG. Wade, University of Delaware, Department of Nursing, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: ghwade@udel.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163815-
dc.description.abstractProfessional nurse autonomy, an essential attribute for achieving full professional status, has been a goal of nursing for over 50 years. A precursor to the exercise of professional nurse autonomy, valuation of autonomy, should be inculcated during the nursing education process. The purpose of this study was to predict a model of the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy based on Watson's Theory of Transpersonal Caring. A secondary aim was to test three carative factors embedded in Watson's theory. Using a model testing correlational design, female nursing students' perceptions of instructor caring behaviors, self-esteem and perceived clinical competence were hypothesized as predictors of the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy. Senior baccalaureate nursing students (N = 317) from 20 NLN accredited baccalaureate nursing programs, selected by quota sampling, responded to the study questionnaires. Entry of each of the three predictors using hierarchical multiple regression revealed that self-esteem, and to a lesser degree, perceived clinical competence explained 11.2% of the variance in the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy. The initial model, subjected to path analysis, was just-identified and could not be tested. After trimming paths that were not statistically significant, the resulting over-identified model fit the data ((2 = 2.77, p = .25). Perceptions of instructor caring behaviors and self-esteem explained 18% of the variance in perceived clinical competence. Perceptions of instructor caring behaviors, self-esteem and perceived clinical competence, however, only explained 10.9% of the variance in the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy. Although these findings provide a baseline for understanding the development of professional nurse autonomy, a large percentage of the variance in the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy was unexplained. Findings suggested the need for an instrument to specifically measure instructor caring behaviors relative to Watson's theory. Further study of perceived clinical competence and self-esteem as predictors of the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy is warranted. This study, however, linked the caring focus of nursing to the attitudinal component of professional nurse autonomy and extended the body of knowledge on caring in nursing and education.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:20Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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