Medication Calculation Ability Of Baccalaureate Nursing Students As A Function Of Method Of Instruction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163816
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Medication Calculation Ability Of Baccalaureate Nursing Students As A Function Of Method Of Instruction
Author(s):
Serembus, Joanne
Author Details:
Joanne Serembus, LaSalle University, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: serembus@lasalle.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this research study was to compare computational ability of nursing students when using the dimensional analysis method for medication dosage calculation with those using the formula/ratio-and-proportion method. It is proposed that research in this area will assist nurse educators in utilizing instructional methods that could result in the least number of drug dosage calculation errors among nursing students. Research Questions: 1) What portion of nursing students have the ability to calculate medication dosages at the 90% mastery level?; 2) Is there a significant difference in medication calculation post-test scores between the dimensional analysis method and formula/ratio-and-proportion method of drug calculation. Hypothesis: 1) There is a significant difference in medication calculation posttest scores between the dimensional analysis method and formula/ratio-and-proportion methods of drug calculation. Theoretical Framework: The cognitive learning model of David Ausubel. Design: Descriptive, pretest/post-test nonequivalent comparison group study. Sample: Convenience sample of junior level baccalaureate nursing students (N=90) obtained from two universities. One university was in Pennsylvania (n=26) and the other was in Delaware (n=64). Method: The 20-item Bayne-Bindler Medication Calculation Test was administered to the dimensional analysis group at school A and formula/ratio-and-proportion group at school B as a pretest and post-test. Internal consistency of the Bayne-Bindler Medication Calculation Test was re-established with the Kuder-Richardson Formula (0.81). Following administration of the pretest School A was taught medication calculations using the dimensional analysis approach and School B was taught medication calculations using the formula/ratio-and-proportion method. Three months elapsed between administration of pretest and post-test. Data Analysis: Frequency counts and ANCOVA were conducted using SPSS/PC 8.0. Results and Conclusions: The highest post-test score obtained was a 75%. Twelve percent of the experimental group and 3% of the comparison group achieved this score. Performance of the dimensional analysis method group as compared with the formula/ratio-and-proportion method group on the Bayne-Bindler Medication Calculation Test revealed statistical significance between the post-test scores of the experimental group and comparison groups (F=66.86, df=1/87, p< .0001). Mean post-test scores indicated that subjects in the experimental group scored higher (M=9.80; SD=3.48) than the comparison group (M=5.70; SD=3.63). Nursing Implications: Given the prevalence of medication calculation errors in nursing practice, it is important that nurse educators eradicate this problem. Future studies could investigate the application of various teaching strategies used to teach dimensional analysis, for the purpose of finding those strategies that best match the student's learning style as well as the use of calculators in solving drug calculations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMedication Calculation Ability Of Baccalaureate Nursing Students As A Function Of Method Of Instructionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSerembus, Joanneen_US
dc.author.detailsJoanne Serembus, LaSalle University, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: serembus@lasalle.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163816-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this research study was to compare computational ability of nursing students when using the dimensional analysis method for medication dosage calculation with those using the formula/ratio-and-proportion method. It is proposed that research in this area will assist nurse educators in utilizing instructional methods that could result in the least number of drug dosage calculation errors among nursing students. Research Questions: 1) What portion of nursing students have the ability to calculate medication dosages at the 90% mastery level?; 2) Is there a significant difference in medication calculation post-test scores between the dimensional analysis method and formula/ratio-and-proportion method of drug calculation. Hypothesis: 1) There is a significant difference in medication calculation posttest scores between the dimensional analysis method and formula/ratio-and-proportion methods of drug calculation. Theoretical Framework: The cognitive learning model of David Ausubel. Design: Descriptive, pretest/post-test nonequivalent comparison group study. Sample: Convenience sample of junior level baccalaureate nursing students (N=90) obtained from two universities. One university was in Pennsylvania (n=26) and the other was in Delaware (n=64). Method: The 20-item Bayne-Bindler Medication Calculation Test was administered to the dimensional analysis group at school A and formula/ratio-and-proportion group at school B as a pretest and post-test. Internal consistency of the Bayne-Bindler Medication Calculation Test was re-established with the Kuder-Richardson Formula (0.81). Following administration of the pretest School A was taught medication calculations using the dimensional analysis approach and School B was taught medication calculations using the formula/ratio-and-proportion method. Three months elapsed between administration of pretest and post-test. Data Analysis: Frequency counts and ANCOVA were conducted using SPSS/PC 8.0. Results and Conclusions: The highest post-test score obtained was a 75%. Twelve percent of the experimental group and 3% of the comparison group achieved this score. Performance of the dimensional analysis method group as compared with the formula/ratio-and-proportion method group on the Bayne-Bindler Medication Calculation Test revealed statistical significance between the post-test scores of the experimental group and comparison groups (F=66.86, df=1/87, p< .0001). Mean post-test scores indicated that subjects in the experimental group scored higher (M=9.80; SD=3.48) than the comparison group (M=5.70; SD=3.63). Nursing Implications: Given the prevalence of medication calculation errors in nursing practice, it is important that nurse educators eradicate this problem. Future studies could investigate the application of various teaching strategies used to teach dimensional analysis, for the purpose of finding those strategies that best match the student's learning style as well as the use of calculators in solving drug calculations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:21Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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