Using Technology To Incorporate Active Learning Strategies To Support Student Learning And Test Taking Initiatives

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163817
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Technology To Incorporate Active Learning Strategies To Support Student Learning And Test Taking Initiatives
Author(s):
Dickerson, Suzanne
Author Details:
Suzanne Dickerson, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Assistant Professor, University of Buffalo, State University of New York, School of Nursing, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: sdickers@buffalo.edu
Abstract:
Baccalaureate nursing education programs are rapidly creating courses to be delivered via the World Wide Web (WWW). The purpose of the study was to evaluate teaching and testing modules used in a course management system (TopClass) that facilitated the use of active learning strategies by nursing students in technology related activities. Eighty nursing students in a health care delivery class in the fall of 1999 evaluated the modules by answering seven open-ended survey questions. Included in the survey was a measure of learning preferences based on Perry's Model of Intellectual Development. Evaluation of the online active learning strategies reflected the complexity of integrating technology into the classroom. Student in the beginning level of intellectual development described difficulty with the online active strategies, which required they be self-directed and technologically savvy. While online activities challenge students' developmental growth, an additional challenge is for faculty to develop, implement, manage and evaluate these strategies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Technology To Incorporate Active Learning Strategies To Support Student Learning And Test Taking Initiativesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDickerson, Suzanneen_US
dc.author.detailsSuzanne Dickerson, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Assistant Professor, University of Buffalo, State University of New York, School of Nursing, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: sdickers@buffalo.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163817-
dc.description.abstractBaccalaureate nursing education programs are rapidly creating courses to be delivered via the World Wide Web (WWW). The purpose of the study was to evaluate teaching and testing modules used in a course management system (TopClass) that facilitated the use of active learning strategies by nursing students in technology related activities. Eighty nursing students in a health care delivery class in the fall of 1999 evaluated the modules by answering seven open-ended survey questions. Included in the survey was a measure of learning preferences based on Perry's Model of Intellectual Development. Evaluation of the online active learning strategies reflected the complexity of integrating technology into the classroom. Student in the beginning level of intellectual development described difficulty with the online active strategies, which required they be self-directed and technologically savvy. While online activities challenge students' developmental growth, an additional challenge is for faculty to develop, implement, manage and evaluate these strategies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:22Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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