2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163818
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Releasing the Pause Button: Mothering Multiples During the First Year of Life
Author(s):
Beck, Cheryl
Author Details:
Cheryl Beck, DSNC, FAAN, Professor, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: cheryl.beck@uconn.edu
Abstract:
At the present time the United States is experiencing the largest number of multiple births in recorded history. This multiple birth explosion presents nursing with a challenge to provide optimal care for these high-risk families. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to investigate the basic problem mothers of twins experience during the first year after delivery and the process they use to resolve this fundamental problem. Two research questions were investigated: (1) What is the basic social psychological problem mothers of twins encounter during the first year after delivery? (2) What social psychological process do mothers of twins use to resolve this fundamental problem? Participant observation and interviews were the two main methods of data collection. Theoretical sampling was used which involved the researcher jointly collecting, coding and analyzing data and then deciding what data to collect next in order to develop the grounded theory. For 14 months the researcher attended Parents of Multiples Group meetings. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with 16 mothers of twins in their homes. The mean age of these 16 mothers was 32. Twelve (75%) of these women had spontaneous twins while four (25%) had twins as a result of infertility treatments. The mean age of the twins when the mothers were interviewed was 8 months with a range from 3 weeks old to 17 months. Glaser and Strauss' constant comparative method of data analysis was used to analyze the transcripts of the interviews and field notes. Life on hold was the basic social psychological problem that mothers of multiples experienced during the first year of their twins' lives. Releasing the Pause Button was the four-stage process mothers of twins progressed through as they attempted to resume their own lives. These four phases included (a) Draining Power, (b) Pausing Own Life, (c) Striving to Reset, (d) Resuming Own Life. Three conditions of Draining Power occurred during the first phase: Unrelenting Demands, Vanishing Time, and Torn Between Two. As a result of these conditions in the lives of mothers of multiples, Pausing Own Life occurred during phase II. This phase consisted of three consequences: Blurring of Days, Confining, and Self-Surrender. In Striving to Reset, the third phase of Life on Hold, mothers used five strategies: Establishing a Routine, Shifting Priorities, Marshalling Help, Problem Solving, and Venturing Out. The fourth and final phase in the substantive theory of Life on Hold was Resuming Own Life which consisted of the following two consequences of the strategies mothers used in the previous phase: Becoming Manageable and Reaping the Blessings. Health care professionals can use this four-phase process of Releasing the Pause Button to locate where in this process mothers of multiples are at. Specific nursing interventions can be designed to target different phases of this substantive theory. The cutting point of 3 months postpartum is a critical juncture for mothers of twins. Intensive interventions need to be in place to support women during this vulnerable period.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReleasing the Pause Button: Mothering Multiples During the First Year of Lifeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeck, Cherylen_US
dc.author.detailsCheryl Beck, DSNC, FAAN, Professor, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: cheryl.beck@uconn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163818-
dc.description.abstractAt the present time the United States is experiencing the largest number of multiple births in recorded history. This multiple birth explosion presents nursing with a challenge to provide optimal care for these high-risk families. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to investigate the basic problem mothers of twins experience during the first year after delivery and the process they use to resolve this fundamental problem. Two research questions were investigated: (1) What is the basic social psychological problem mothers of twins encounter during the first year after delivery? (2) What social psychological process do mothers of twins use to resolve this fundamental problem? Participant observation and interviews were the two main methods of data collection. Theoretical sampling was used which involved the researcher jointly collecting, coding and analyzing data and then deciding what data to collect next in order to develop the grounded theory. For 14 months the researcher attended Parents of Multiples Group meetings. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with 16 mothers of twins in their homes. The mean age of these 16 mothers was 32. Twelve (75%) of these women had spontaneous twins while four (25%) had twins as a result of infertility treatments. The mean age of the twins when the mothers were interviewed was 8 months with a range from 3 weeks old to 17 months. Glaser and Strauss' constant comparative method of data analysis was used to analyze the transcripts of the interviews and field notes. Life on hold was the basic social psychological problem that mothers of multiples experienced during the first year of their twins' lives. Releasing the Pause Button was the four-stage process mothers of twins progressed through as they attempted to resume their own lives. These four phases included (a) Draining Power, (b) Pausing Own Life, (c) Striving to Reset, (d) Resuming Own Life. Three conditions of Draining Power occurred during the first phase: Unrelenting Demands, Vanishing Time, and Torn Between Two. As a result of these conditions in the lives of mothers of multiples, Pausing Own Life occurred during phase II. This phase consisted of three consequences: Blurring of Days, Confining, and Self-Surrender. In Striving to Reset, the third phase of Life on Hold, mothers used five strategies: Establishing a Routine, Shifting Priorities, Marshalling Help, Problem Solving, and Venturing Out. The fourth and final phase in the substantive theory of Life on Hold was Resuming Own Life which consisted of the following two consequences of the strategies mothers used in the previous phase: Becoming Manageable and Reaping the Blessings. Health care professionals can use this four-phase process of Releasing the Pause Button to locate where in this process mothers of multiples are at. Specific nursing interventions can be designed to target different phases of this substantive theory. The cutting point of 3 months postpartum is a critical juncture for mothers of twins. Intensive interventions need to be in place to support women during this vulnerable period.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:23Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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