The effect of guided imagery and music on pain and anxiety during laceration repair

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163824
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The effect of guided imagery and music on pain and anxiety during laceration repair
Author(s):
Albert, Rachel
Author Details:
Dr. Rachel E. Albert, University of Main, Fort Kent, ME, email: realbert@maine.edu
Abstract:
Pain is one of the most common chief symptoms of patients seeking emergency health care services. Many patients, who needlessly suffer during painful procedures, may benefit from nonpharmacological pain relief interventions in addition to pharmacological therapies. Guided imagery and music (GIM) offer safe, adjuvant modalities of pain and anxiety reduction. This experimental pretest-posttest study investigated the effect of a combined GIM intervention on both physiological (sensory) and psychological (affective) components of acute pain and situational anxiety during laceration repair in the emergency department (ED). The acute pain management theory (Good & Moore, 1996) and the gate control theory (Melzack & Casey, 1968) provided the conceptual framework. Using a completely randomized experimental design, a convenience sample of 84 adults presenting with uncomplicated lacerations in three urban medical center EDs, were randomly assigned to a one of two groups: (1) GIM or (2) control group. Subjects in the treatment group listened to a combination of GIM that began with the first suture to the tying of the last suture. Pre- and posttest data were collected via the situational anxiety, pain sensation, and pain distress 100 mm visual analogue scales. Partial correlation analyses revealed that situational anxiety was significantly related to pain sensation while controlling for distress (r = .37, p < .001), and that situational anxiety was also significantly related to pain distress while controlling for pain sensation (r = .43, p < .001). Therefore, the pretest scores were used as covariates in the multiple regression analyses. Using multiple regression with gender, local anesthetic, and pretest measures as covariates, the combination of GIM did not significantly decrease pain sensation, pain distress, or situational anxiety. Pre to post test pain sensation, distress, and situational anxiety decreased by 48%, 27%, and 33% in the intervention group as compared to 50%, 69%, and 22% in the control group, respectively. Although effects on pain outcomes were not found, 81% of the patients reported that the intervention was slightly to very beneficial, 71% would use it again for other painful procedures, and 91% would recommend it to others.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe effect of guided imagery and music on pain and anxiety during laceration repairen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlbert, Rachelen_US
dc.author.detailsDr. Rachel E. Albert, University of Main, Fort Kent, ME, email: realbert@maine.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163824-
dc.description.abstractPain is one of the most common chief symptoms of patients seeking emergency health care services. Many patients, who needlessly suffer during painful procedures, may benefit from nonpharmacological pain relief interventions in addition to pharmacological therapies. Guided imagery and music (GIM) offer safe, adjuvant modalities of pain and anxiety reduction. This experimental pretest-posttest study investigated the effect of a combined GIM intervention on both physiological (sensory) and psychological (affective) components of acute pain and situational anxiety during laceration repair in the emergency department (ED). The acute pain management theory (Good & Moore, 1996) and the gate control theory (Melzack & Casey, 1968) provided the conceptual framework. Using a completely randomized experimental design, a convenience sample of 84 adults presenting with uncomplicated lacerations in three urban medical center EDs, were randomly assigned to a one of two groups: (1) GIM or (2) control group. Subjects in the treatment group listened to a combination of GIM that began with the first suture to the tying of the last suture. Pre- and posttest data were collected via the situational anxiety, pain sensation, and pain distress 100 mm visual analogue scales. Partial correlation analyses revealed that situational anxiety was significantly related to pain sensation while controlling for distress (r = .37, p < .001), and that situational anxiety was also significantly related to pain distress while controlling for pain sensation (r = .43, p < .001). Therefore, the pretest scores were used as covariates in the multiple regression analyses. Using multiple regression with gender, local anesthetic, and pretest measures as covariates, the combination of GIM did not significantly decrease pain sensation, pain distress, or situational anxiety. Pre to post test pain sensation, distress, and situational anxiety decreased by 48%, 27%, and 33% in the intervention group as compared to 50%, 69%, and 22% in the control group, respectively. Although effects on pain outcomes were not found, 81% of the patients reported that the intervention was slightly to very beneficial, 71% would use it again for other painful procedures, and 91% would recommend it to others.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:29Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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