2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163828
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive representations of AIDS: A phenomenological study
Author(s):
Anderson, Elizabeth; Spendder, Margaret Hutt
Author Details:
Elizabeth Anderson, Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Harwinton, Connecticut, USA, email: elizabeth.anderson@uconn.edu; Margaret Hull Spencer
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe AIDS patients' cognitive representations of their illness through a phenomenological study. Research question: What are the cognitive representations or images that AIDS patients have of their illness? Framework: Within Leventhal's Common Sense Model of Illness, patients are viewed as active problem solvers whose behavior is a product of their cognitive and emotional responses to a health threat. In an ongoing process, people transform internal (e.g. symptoms) or external (e.g. laboratory results) stimuli into schema or cognitive representations of threat and/or emotional reaction. How persons living with AIDS image their disease may be key to understanding coping processes, medication adherence, and/or quality of life. Methods: Design was phenomenological. Sample: Purposive sample of 40 men and 15 women with diagnosis of AIDS were recruited from AIDS facilities in a major city in the Northeast. Inclusion criteria: 18 years of age or older, diagnosis of AIDS, English speaking, Mini-Mental Status Exam > 22. Analysis: Colaizzi's (1978) phenomenological method was used: Written transcripts were read several times to obtain overall feel for them; significant phrases and sentences identified; meanings formulated and clustered into themes; results integrated into in-depth exhaustive description; and findings validated. Methodological rigor was established through credibility, auditability, and fittingness criteria (Beck, 1993). Results: Race and ethnicity were well represented. Average age was 42 years (SD=8). Majority had less than high school education (51%) and never married (55%). Mean CD4 count 159 (SD=165) and average time from HIV diagnosis to interview 106 months (SD=63). From 168 significant statements, nine themes emerged. In one theme, AIDS was viewed as voraciously devouring any hope of life. Rich and varied images included AIDS as leprosy, death, a big "blob" that swallows a person, and not being able to get out of a hole. In the theme: the Magic of Not Thinking, Makes "IT" Disappear, people tried to wipe AIDS out of their minds so that the word, AIDS, was rarely spoken. Conclusions: The lived experience of AIDS was dangerous with an engulfing fear of body wasting. Responses to AIDS included not coping, blocking AIDS from the mind, to a hyper vigilance in all areas. Search for the "right" drug was relentless. Relationships were a source of life. Feelings ranged from devastating, sad, and angry to being at peace and not worrying. Implications for nursing practice and knowledge development in nursing: Inquiring about a patient's image of AIDS may help nurses better assess patients' coping processes and enhance nurse-patient relationships by providing patients with an opportunity to share at an in-depth level. Future research is needed to determine if there is an association between specific illness representations and medication adherence or quality of life in persons living with AIDS.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive representations of AIDS: A phenomenological studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpendder, Margaret Hutten_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Anderson, Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Harwinton, Connecticut, USA, email: elizabeth.anderson@uconn.edu; Margaret Hull Spenceren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163828-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe AIDS patients' cognitive representations of their illness through a phenomenological study. Research question: What are the cognitive representations or images that AIDS patients have of their illness? Framework: Within Leventhal's Common Sense Model of Illness, patients are viewed as active problem solvers whose behavior is a product of their cognitive and emotional responses to a health threat. In an ongoing process, people transform internal (e.g. symptoms) or external (e.g. laboratory results) stimuli into schema or cognitive representations of threat and/or emotional reaction. How persons living with AIDS image their disease may be key to understanding coping processes, medication adherence, and/or quality of life. Methods: Design was phenomenological. Sample: Purposive sample of 40 men and 15 women with diagnosis of AIDS were recruited from AIDS facilities in a major city in the Northeast. Inclusion criteria: 18 years of age or older, diagnosis of AIDS, English speaking, Mini-Mental Status Exam > 22. Analysis: Colaizzi's (1978) phenomenological method was used: Written transcripts were read several times to obtain overall feel for them; significant phrases and sentences identified; meanings formulated and clustered into themes; results integrated into in-depth exhaustive description; and findings validated. Methodological rigor was established through credibility, auditability, and fittingness criteria (Beck, 1993). Results: Race and ethnicity were well represented. Average age was 42 years (SD=8). Majority had less than high school education (51%) and never married (55%). Mean CD4 count 159 (SD=165) and average time from HIV diagnosis to interview 106 months (SD=63). From 168 significant statements, nine themes emerged. In one theme, AIDS was viewed as voraciously devouring any hope of life. Rich and varied images included AIDS as leprosy, death, a big "blob" that swallows a person, and not being able to get out of a hole. In the theme: the Magic of Not Thinking, Makes "IT" Disappear, people tried to wipe AIDS out of their minds so that the word, AIDS, was rarely spoken. Conclusions: The lived experience of AIDS was dangerous with an engulfing fear of body wasting. Responses to AIDS included not coping, blocking AIDS from the mind, to a hyper vigilance in all areas. Search for the "right" drug was relentless. Relationships were a source of life. Feelings ranged from devastating, sad, and angry to being at peace and not worrying. Implications for nursing practice and knowledge development in nursing: Inquiring about a patient's image of AIDS may help nurses better assess patients' coping processes and enhance nurse-patient relationships by providing patients with an opportunity to share at an in-depth level. Future research is needed to determine if there is an association between specific illness representations and medication adherence or quality of life in persons living with AIDS.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:33Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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