2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163829
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A comparison of heel ulcer prevention methods during early hospitalization
Author(s):
Appleby, Susan; Bobb, Milton S. Anne D.; Lebo, Marjorie A.
Author Details:
Susan Appleby, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: sappleby@psu.edu; Milton S. Anne D. Bobb; Marjorie A. Lebo
Abstract:
Purpose: A clinically significant number of patients develop hospital-acquired heel pressure ulcers, yet little is known about the effects of heel protection methods in preventing their occurrence. We conducted a study to evaluate the risks associated with the development of heel ulceration and to test the benefits of several interventions. Specific Aims: Specifically, we examined risk factors associated with the development of heel pressure ulcers during early hospitalization and determined the effectiveness of several heel protection methods (boot, foot waffle, suspension boot, pillow, or standard protocol) in reducing heel pressure and preventing heel ulcers. Framework: Levine's theoretical framework focusing on the principle for conservation of structural integrity guided this investigation. Methods: A repeated measures design was used to evaluate 40 subjects (mean age 74.3 +/- 14.2 years) admitted to medical service units at risk for heel ulceration (Braden Scale scores < 14). Subjects were randomized to one of five heel ulcer prevention methods (boot, foot waffle, suspension boot, pillow, or a standard protocol) for three days. Baseline and daily assessments of skin breakdown using the National Advisory Pressure Ulcer Staging Classification and Braden Scale scores were obtained. The number of hours that heel protectors were in place was recorded each day. Results and Conclusions: There were no statistically significant differences between groups for age, weight and baseline Braden Scale scores. Only two of twenty-six subjects developed a Stage 1 ulcer by day 2. No statistically significant between-group differences in Braden Scale scores were noted over time, indicating subjects' risks for heel ulceration remained similar throughout the study. The average number of hours that the heel protectors were used did not differ between groups for both day 1 or 2. We conclude that all methods were effective in preventing the occurrence of heel pressure ulcers for patients with similar risk factors (e.g., age, weight and Braden Scale scores). Implications for nursing practice and knowledge development in nursing: This study has significant implications for methodologies to study heel ulcer prevention including the need for large sample sizes to detect differences in treatment outcomes. It appears that regardless of what device is used, heel elevation is critical to reduce the occurrence of pressure-induced heel ulcers.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA comparison of heel ulcer prevention methods during early hospitalizationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAppleby, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorBobb, Milton S. Anne D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLebo, Marjorie A.en_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Appleby, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: sappleby@psu.edu; Milton S. Anne D. Bobb; Marjorie A. Leboen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163829-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: A clinically significant number of patients develop hospital-acquired heel pressure ulcers, yet little is known about the effects of heel protection methods in preventing their occurrence. We conducted a study to evaluate the risks associated with the development of heel ulceration and to test the benefits of several interventions. Specific Aims: Specifically, we examined risk factors associated with the development of heel pressure ulcers during early hospitalization and determined the effectiveness of several heel protection methods (boot, foot waffle, suspension boot, pillow, or standard protocol) in reducing heel pressure and preventing heel ulcers. Framework: Levine's theoretical framework focusing on the principle for conservation of structural integrity guided this investigation. Methods: A repeated measures design was used to evaluate 40 subjects (mean age 74.3 +/- 14.2 years) admitted to medical service units at risk for heel ulceration (Braden Scale scores < 14). Subjects were randomized to one of five heel ulcer prevention methods (boot, foot waffle, suspension boot, pillow, or a standard protocol) for three days. Baseline and daily assessments of skin breakdown using the National Advisory Pressure Ulcer Staging Classification and Braden Scale scores were obtained. The number of hours that heel protectors were in place was recorded each day. Results and Conclusions: There were no statistically significant differences between groups for age, weight and baseline Braden Scale scores. Only two of twenty-six subjects developed a Stage 1 ulcer by day 2. No statistically significant between-group differences in Braden Scale scores were noted over time, indicating subjects' risks for heel ulceration remained similar throughout the study. The average number of hours that the heel protectors were used did not differ between groups for both day 1 or 2. We conclude that all methods were effective in preventing the occurrence of heel pressure ulcers for patients with similar risk factors (e.g., age, weight and Braden Scale scores). Implications for nursing practice and knowledge development in nursing: This study has significant implications for methodologies to study heel ulcer prevention including the need for large sample sizes to detect differences in treatment outcomes. It appears that regardless of what device is used, heel elevation is critical to reduce the occurrence of pressure-induced heel ulcers. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:34Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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