2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163831
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An exploration of teaching in the preceptor/nurse intern relationship
Author(s):
Asselin, Marilyn
Author Details:
Marilyn Asselin, Coventry, Rhode Island, USA, email: marasselin@aol.com
Abstract:
It is generally recognized that the transition from novice to professional nurse in the acute care setting is one of the most stressful times in a nurse's career. Current transition from graduate nurse to staff nurse is facilitated by the use of comprehensive orientation programs in which a clinical preceptor, serving as a role model, assists the novice to learn/refine professional leadership skills, technical skills, manage changing priorities, and become socialized into the new culture. Despite an abundance of literature on preceptorships, there is little information on how the teaching relationship between novice and preceptor evolves or specific teaching strategies that work best to support the transition from novice to professional nurse. A descriptive, exploratory design, with participant observation, and focus group, was used to answer the following research questions: 1. What is the actual role relationship between the preceptor and the nurse intern? 2. To what extent is the preceptor a socializing agent for the new nurse? 3. What is the range of the teaching strategies that the preceptors use with the nurse interns? 4. What do the preceptors and interns each perceive as the most helpful teaching strategy as the novice transitions to the RN role? Study participants consisted of 4 preceptors and 4 nurse interns who participated in an 11-week nurse internship program at a 359-bed acute care hospital. Participants were observed for 1-2 hour intervals during their work. They also participated in a 1-hour focus group at the end of the program. The preceptor/nurse intern relationship evolved along a continuum from preceptor telling and questioning to intern questioning/preceptor sharing to mutual sharing as colleagues. Confidence in the intern and rapport were established early through mutual observations and questioning. Communication was identified as a key ingredient to a successful relationship and transition. Characteristics of preceptors included patience, knowledge and experience, organizational skills, nonjudgmental behavior, openness, and humor. Preceptors socialized interns to the formal and informal unit groups, routines and procedures through role modeling and informal discussions on and off shift. Teaching strategies identified included role modeling, searching for themes among chaos, explaining or thinking out loud as doing, demonstrations and return demonstrations, summarizing at the end of each shift. off shift teaching took place, consisting of explaining the "whys" of the shift activities, through phone conversations or e-mails. Preceptors and interns both identified thinking aloud as the most important teaching strategy in transitioning to the RN role.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn exploration of teaching in the preceptor/nurse intern relationshipen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAsselin, Marilynen_US
dc.author.detailsMarilyn Asselin, Coventry, Rhode Island, USA, email: marasselin@aol.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163831-
dc.description.abstractIt is generally recognized that the transition from novice to professional nurse in the acute care setting is one of the most stressful times in a nurse's career. Current transition from graduate nurse to staff nurse is facilitated by the use of comprehensive orientation programs in which a clinical preceptor, serving as a role model, assists the novice to learn/refine professional leadership skills, technical skills, manage changing priorities, and become socialized into the new culture. Despite an abundance of literature on preceptorships, there is little information on how the teaching relationship between novice and preceptor evolves or specific teaching strategies that work best to support the transition from novice to professional nurse. A descriptive, exploratory design, with participant observation, and focus group, was used to answer the following research questions: 1. What is the actual role relationship between the preceptor and the nurse intern? 2. To what extent is the preceptor a socializing agent for the new nurse? 3. What is the range of the teaching strategies that the preceptors use with the nurse interns? 4. What do the preceptors and interns each perceive as the most helpful teaching strategy as the novice transitions to the RN role? Study participants consisted of 4 preceptors and 4 nurse interns who participated in an 11-week nurse internship program at a 359-bed acute care hospital. Participants were observed for 1-2 hour intervals during their work. They also participated in a 1-hour focus group at the end of the program. The preceptor/nurse intern relationship evolved along a continuum from preceptor telling and questioning to intern questioning/preceptor sharing to mutual sharing as colleagues. Confidence in the intern and rapport were established early through mutual observations and questioning. Communication was identified as a key ingredient to a successful relationship and transition. Characteristics of preceptors included patience, knowledge and experience, organizational skills, nonjudgmental behavior, openness, and humor. Preceptors socialized interns to the formal and informal unit groups, routines and procedures through role modeling and informal discussions on and off shift. Teaching strategies identified included role modeling, searching for themes among chaos, explaining or thinking out loud as doing, demonstrations and return demonstrations, summarizing at the end of each shift. off shift teaching took place, consisting of explaining the "whys" of the shift activities, through phone conversations or e-mails. Preceptors and interns both identified thinking aloud as the most important teaching strategy in transitioning to the RN role.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:36Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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