2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163834
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Work Environment: Impact of Shift Satisfaction on Nurse Performance
Author(s):
Ruggiero, Jeanne; Fiedler, Nancy; Redeker, Nancy S.
Author Details:
Jeanne Ruggiero, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Rutgers University College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: jruggier@andromeda.rutgers.edu; Nancy Fiedler, PhD; Nancy S. Redeker, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: Empirical literature indicates that a supportive work environment promotes positive nurse and patient outcomes in hospitals. However, the specific effects of job satisfaction on performance outcomes have not been explicated. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the mechanisms through which satisfaction with scheduling might positively influence nurse performance outcomes. Theoretical Framework: Chronobiological theory posits that shift work results in a disruption of diurnal circadian rhythms, leading to the experience of adverse events such as performance deficits. Sociological theories propose that hospitals in which nurses have input into scheduling and other practice environment decisions will experience superior outcomes. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): 18 staff RNs working day and night shifts were randomly sampled from the membership of the American Association of Critical Care Nurses and completed a 10-minute visual psychomotor vigilance task (pre-programmed into a PVT 192 reaction time system) before and after workshifts for two or more continuous 24-hour periods. Metrics (median, mean of fastest 10% and slowest 10% of reaction times; number of lapses > 500 milliseconds) were derived from the final test taken at the end of two workdays (or nights). Participants also completed the Standard Shiftwork Index Biographical Section, including a one-item measure of satisfaction with shift schedule (SWSS). Results: SWSS was related to fewer lapses (r = -.66; p< .01) and improvement in slowest mean reaction time (r= -.66; p< .01). Longer stretches of workdays between days off were related to increased median reaction time (r=.48; p< .05) and deterioration in fastest mean reaction time (r = .56; p< .05). Conclusions and Implications: Findings provide preliminary support for the positive impact of shift satisfaction on nurse performance, as well as the deleterious impact of long workday stretches on nurses' performance. Further research is needed to further explore if self-scheduling will improve nurses' job satisfaction and performance. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Work Environment: Impact of Shift Satisfaction on Nurse Performanceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRuggiero, Jeanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorFiedler, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.authorRedeker, Nancy S.en_US
dc.author.detailsJeanne Ruggiero, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Rutgers University College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: jruggier@andromeda.rutgers.edu; Nancy Fiedler, PhD; Nancy S. Redeker, PhD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163834-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Empirical literature indicates that a supportive work environment promotes positive nurse and patient outcomes in hospitals. However, the specific effects of job satisfaction on performance outcomes have not been explicated. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the mechanisms through which satisfaction with scheduling might positively influence nurse performance outcomes. Theoretical Framework: Chronobiological theory posits that shift work results in a disruption of diurnal circadian rhythms, leading to the experience of adverse events such as performance deficits. Sociological theories propose that hospitals in which nurses have input into scheduling and other practice environment decisions will experience superior outcomes. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): 18 staff RNs working day and night shifts were randomly sampled from the membership of the American Association of Critical Care Nurses and completed a 10-minute visual psychomotor vigilance task (pre-programmed into a PVT 192 reaction time system) before and after workshifts for two or more continuous 24-hour periods. Metrics (median, mean of fastest 10% and slowest 10% of reaction times; number of lapses > 500 milliseconds) were derived from the final test taken at the end of two workdays (or nights). Participants also completed the Standard Shiftwork Index Biographical Section, including a one-item measure of satisfaction with shift schedule (SWSS). Results: SWSS was related to fewer lapses (r = -.66; p< .01) and improvement in slowest mean reaction time (r= -.66; p< .01). Longer stretches of workdays between days off were related to increased median reaction time (r=.48; p< .05) and deterioration in fastest mean reaction time (r = .56; p< .05). Conclusions and Implications: Findings provide preliminary support for the positive impact of shift satisfaction on nurse performance, as well as the deleterious impact of long workday stretches on nurses' performance. Further research is needed to further explore if self-scheduling will improve nurses' job satisfaction and performance. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:40Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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