The Use and Preference for Conventional and Unconventional Methods of Cancer Pain Treatment among African Americans

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163835
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Use and Preference for Conventional and Unconventional Methods of Cancer Pain Treatment among African Americans
Author(s):
Moriarty, Helene; Meghani, Salimah H.
Author Details:
Helene Moriarty, Professor, Villanova University, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA, email: helene.moriarty@villanova.edu; Alimah H. Meghani, PhD, MBE, CRNP
Abstract:
Purpose: This study describes African Americans' preference for conventional and complementary and alternative (CAM) forms of treatment for cancer pain. Background: A growing body of literature points to racial/ethnic disparities in cancer pain treatment. Most existing studies allude to provider prescribing practices as a major factor in these disparities. There is a paucity of literature on how patients' preferences for conventional and unconventional methods of cancer pain treatment may shape their pain treatment negotiations with providers. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A mixed-method, QUAL+quant design (Tashakkori & Teddlie, 1998) was employed for this inquiry. A sample of self-identified African Americans (n=32) with solid tumors was recruited from 3 oncology clinics in mid-Atlantic region. Qualitative data were gathered using semi-structured interviews and analyzed using qualitative content analysis (Atlas/ti 5.0). Quantitative data were obtained using the standardized Brief Pain Inventory-Long Form and analyzed using non-parametric measures. Results: A majority of the participants (81.2%) reported experiencing moderate to severe pain but only 37.5% reported their preference for taking analgesics on a regular basis. Less than half (47%) of the participants reported using CAM to relieve cancer-related pain, however, most expressed fears towards using orally-ingested forms of CAM. From interview data, a typology of preference for conventional analgesics was identified: (1) Non-believers, (2) Centralists and (3) Strong believers. Non-believers were futuristic, survival-oriented and believed analgesics masked their ability to identify cancer progression. Centralists believed analgesics to be a bittersweet; they did not believe in taking analgesics but resorted to them in favor of reduced pain severity. Strong-believers articulated fewer dilemmas in using analgesics and reported fewer side-effects. Conclusions and Implications: Considerable intracultural differences exist in participants' preference for conventional and unconventional forms of cancer pain treatment. These findings point to the significance of patient-level factors in understanding and addressing pain treatment disparities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Use and Preference for Conventional and Unconventional Methods of Cancer Pain Treatment among African Americansen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoriarty, Heleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeghani, Salimah H.en_US
dc.author.detailsHelene Moriarty, Professor, Villanova University, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA, email: helene.moriarty@villanova.edu; Alimah H. Meghani, PhD, MBE, CRNPen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163835-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study describes African Americans' preference for conventional and complementary and alternative (CAM) forms of treatment for cancer pain. Background: A growing body of literature points to racial/ethnic disparities in cancer pain treatment. Most existing studies allude to provider prescribing practices as a major factor in these disparities. There is a paucity of literature on how patients' preferences for conventional and unconventional methods of cancer pain treatment may shape their pain treatment negotiations with providers. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A mixed-method, QUAL+quant design (Tashakkori & Teddlie, 1998) was employed for this inquiry. A sample of self-identified African Americans (n=32) with solid tumors was recruited from 3 oncology clinics in mid-Atlantic region. Qualitative data were gathered using semi-structured interviews and analyzed using qualitative content analysis (Atlas/ti 5.0). Quantitative data were obtained using the standardized Brief Pain Inventory-Long Form and analyzed using non-parametric measures. Results: A majority of the participants (81.2%) reported experiencing moderate to severe pain but only 37.5% reported their preference for taking analgesics on a regular basis. Less than half (47%) of the participants reported using CAM to relieve cancer-related pain, however, most expressed fears towards using orally-ingested forms of CAM. From interview data, a typology of preference for conventional analgesics was identified: (1) Non-believers, (2) Centralists and (3) Strong believers. Non-believers were futuristic, survival-oriented and believed analgesics masked their ability to identify cancer progression. Centralists believed analgesics to be a bittersweet; they did not believe in taking analgesics but resorted to them in favor of reduced pain severity. Strong-believers articulated fewer dilemmas in using analgesics and reported fewer side-effects. Conclusions and Implications: Considerable intracultural differences exist in participants' preference for conventional and unconventional forms of cancer pain treatment. These findings point to the significance of patient-level factors in understanding and addressing pain treatment disparities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:14:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:14:41Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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