2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163863
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Trendelenburg: A Literature Review
Author(s):
Haldeman, Sioban M.
Author Details:
Sioban M. Haldeman, RN, MSN, CS, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Problem: The use of Trendelenburg for hypotension is widely practiced yet most clinicians cannot identify the research that supports using this position. Purpose: To provide an integrated review of the literature examining the use of Trendelenburg for hypotension. Significance: Trendelenburg has a historical basis for use in hypotensive patients and is widely utilized and established nursing intervention for the treatment of hypotension. It is considered by many providers to be effective and safe. Indications for this position are widely varied. Methods: A comprehensive review of the medical and nursing research literature to support the use Trendelenburg in adult patients was undertaken. Nine research studies were reviewed for sample selection, sample size, research design, results and conclusions. A survey of Critical Care Nurses was also reviewed. Findings that support the use of this intervention are scant. Evaluation: Based upon this integrated review, Trendelenburg as a treatment for hypotension is ineffective and potentially quite harmful. Disease states and individual patient factors may be critical to consider before using this position. More research is needed to determine the optimal positioning for hypotensive patients. Implications for Nursing Practice: Based upon the available findings, nurses and other providers must appreciate the quality of research available regarding this intervention as well and the need for further research. Nurses must cease the practice of Trendelenburg for hypotension in patients until supporting evidence is established. Clinical Nurse Specialists must disseminate this information and seek to support this practice change. A clinical practice change has taken place within an Interventional Cardiology unit based upon this literature review.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTrendelenburg: A Literature Reviewen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHaldeman, Sioban M.en_US
dc.author.detailsSioban M. Haldeman, RN, MSN, CS, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163863-
dc.description.abstractProblem: The use of Trendelenburg for hypotension is widely practiced yet most clinicians cannot identify the research that supports using this position. Purpose: To provide an integrated review of the literature examining the use of Trendelenburg for hypotension. Significance: Trendelenburg has a historical basis for use in hypotensive patients and is widely utilized and established nursing intervention for the treatment of hypotension. It is considered by many providers to be effective and safe. Indications for this position are widely varied. Methods: A comprehensive review of the medical and nursing research literature to support the use Trendelenburg in adult patients was undertaken. Nine research studies were reviewed for sample selection, sample size, research design, results and conclusions. A survey of Critical Care Nurses was also reviewed. Findings that support the use of this intervention are scant. Evaluation: Based upon this integrated review, Trendelenburg as a treatment for hypotension is ineffective and potentially quite harmful. Disease states and individual patient factors may be critical to consider before using this position. More research is needed to determine the optimal positioning for hypotensive patients. Implications for Nursing Practice: Based upon the available findings, nurses and other providers must appreciate the quality of research available regarding this intervention as well and the need for further research. Nurses must cease the practice of Trendelenburg for hypotension in patients until supporting evidence is established. Clinical Nurse Specialists must disseminate this information and seek to support this practice change. A clinical practice change has taken place within an Interventional Cardiology unit based upon this literature review.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:40:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:40:32Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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