2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163865
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Experience of Acute Myocardial Infarction and Delay Time in Seeking Treatment
Author(s):
Halloran, Laurel
Author Details:
Laurel Halloran, PhD, APRN, Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, Connecticut, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
In the United Sated, heart disease kills more women than any other health condition. Unfortunately, women who are having a heart attack frequently delay seeking lifesaving emergency medical care. This may be because women fail to recognize that their symptoms could indicate a heart attack. Most research and intervention in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease has been based on studies done with a predominantly male population. Research on women is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine the presenting symptoms of women experiencing an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and its relation to delay in seeking treatment. A random retrospective sample (N=59) of females discharged from a community hospital with a diagnosis of AMI was evaluated for presenting symptomotology. Data were analyzed through descriptive statistics and chi-square. The sample was separated into two groups: typical or atypical symptoms based on the Coronary Artery Surgery Study (1994). Thirty women (51%) reported typical symptoms with substernal chest pain being the primary complaint. Twenty-nine women (49%) reported atypical symptoms. These symptoms did not include any of the typical symptoms of AMI. In addition, all 30 women in the typical group also complained of atypical symptoms. All 59 women (100% of the sample) experienced atypical symptoms. The most common atypical symptom was shortness of breath. There was no association between the experience of typical or atypical symptoms and delay time in seeking medical treatment. However, there was no documentation regarding time of onset of symptoms and the arrival to the hospital in 29% of the sample. Of the 42 women with documentation 27 (46%) delayed for more than four hours before seeking treatment and 15 delayed less than four hours. There was no significant difference in delay times between typical and atypical groups. However, timing is especially critical since those with "atypical" symptoms received significantly less anti-thrombolytic therapy, the mainstay of AMI treatment. Clearly, it should be a priority to educate both women and health care providers to recognize the atypical signs of acute myocardial infarction.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Experience of Acute Myocardial Infarction and Delay Time in Seeking Treatmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorHalloran, Laurelen_US
dc.author.detailsLaurel Halloran, PhD, APRN, Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, Connecticut, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163865-
dc.description.abstractIn the United Sated, heart disease kills more women than any other health condition. Unfortunately, women who are having a heart attack frequently delay seeking lifesaving emergency medical care. This may be because women fail to recognize that their symptoms could indicate a heart attack. Most research and intervention in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease has been based on studies done with a predominantly male population. Research on women is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine the presenting symptoms of women experiencing an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and its relation to delay in seeking treatment. A random retrospective sample (N=59) of females discharged from a community hospital with a diagnosis of AMI was evaluated for presenting symptomotology. Data were analyzed through descriptive statistics and chi-square. The sample was separated into two groups: typical or atypical symptoms based on the Coronary Artery Surgery Study (1994). Thirty women (51%) reported typical symptoms with substernal chest pain being the primary complaint. Twenty-nine women (49%) reported atypical symptoms. These symptoms did not include any of the typical symptoms of AMI. In addition, all 30 women in the typical group also complained of atypical symptoms. All 59 women (100% of the sample) experienced atypical symptoms. The most common atypical symptom was shortness of breath. There was no association between the experience of typical or atypical symptoms and delay time in seeking medical treatment. However, there was no documentation regarding time of onset of symptoms and the arrival to the hospital in 29% of the sample. Of the 42 women with documentation 27 (46%) delayed for more than four hours before seeking treatment and 15 delayed less than four hours. There was no significant difference in delay times between typical and atypical groups. However, timing is especially critical since those with "atypical" symptoms received significantly less anti-thrombolytic therapy, the mainstay of AMI treatment. Clearly, it should be a priority to educate both women and health care providers to recognize the atypical signs of acute myocardial infarction.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:40:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:40:34Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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