Creation of a Skin, Wound Assessment Team (SWAT): A Multidisciplinary Approach To Optimize Skin Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163868
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Creation of a Skin, Wound Assessment Team (SWAT): A Multidisciplinary Approach To Optimize Skin Care
Author(s):
Hepburn-Smith, Millie
Author Details:
Millie Hepburn-Smith, MSN, RN, CS, Pinnacle Health System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose/Objectives: Identifying patients at potential risk for skin breakdown, and involving caregivers at all levels in planning preventive strategies for pressure reduction is shown to prevent actual skin breakdown in the hospitalized medical patient. The patient with skin breakdown is at high risk for the development of hospital-acquired infections. The JCAHO safety objectives mention hospital-acquired infections as a preventable patient problem. The clinical nurse specialist plays a unique role in program design, development and support to assure early intervention for patients at risk. Background/Rationale: Individuals with medical problems are often at the highest risk for skin breakdown of all hospitalized patients. Whenever an individual experiences changes in intake, ineffective waste removal mechanisms, or a loss of sensation or functional mobility, the risk for skin breakdown escalates significantly. Skin breakdown has been shown to increase a risk for infections, and often extends a patient's length of stay. Description of the Project: Patient care assistants at an urban hospital assume primary responsibility for skin care, assisting patients with all levels of bathing and ADL's. Patients at risk for skin breakdown are identified through use of the Braden Scale in the automated documentation information system. A report is generated for staff, which highlights patients at risk. The wound ostomy continence nurse obtains the report, and makes rounds on patients with unit RN's and nursing assistants. Together, decisions are made regarding wound treatment, pressure relief mechanisms, and optimal preventive strategies. The patient care assistants are then able to identify skin changes and report findings to the RN when appropriate. The RN may then decide to consult with the registered dietician regarding nutritional support, or the physical therapist for assistance with ambulatory function. Outcomes: Outcome measures include a decrease in overall length of stay, and improved patient and family satisfaction with care provided. Interpretation/Conclusion: The SWAT team encourages collaborative care behaviors of all staff, and facilitates early intervention modalities to support skin integrity. Implications for Nursing Practice: Ongoing surveillance of potential skin breakdown stimulates innovative nursing practice through consultation, critical thinking and patient assessment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCreation of a Skin, Wound Assessment Team (SWAT): A Multidisciplinary Approach To Optimize Skin Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHepburn-Smith, Millieen_US
dc.author.detailsMillie Hepburn-Smith, MSN, RN, CS, Pinnacle Health System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163868-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Objectives: Identifying patients at potential risk for skin breakdown, and involving caregivers at all levels in planning preventive strategies for pressure reduction is shown to prevent actual skin breakdown in the hospitalized medical patient. The patient with skin breakdown is at high risk for the development of hospital-acquired infections. The JCAHO safety objectives mention hospital-acquired infections as a preventable patient problem. The clinical nurse specialist plays a unique role in program design, development and support to assure early intervention for patients at risk. Background/Rationale: Individuals with medical problems are often at the highest risk for skin breakdown of all hospitalized patients. Whenever an individual experiences changes in intake, ineffective waste removal mechanisms, or a loss of sensation or functional mobility, the risk for skin breakdown escalates significantly. Skin breakdown has been shown to increase a risk for infections, and often extends a patient's length of stay. Description of the Project: Patient care assistants at an urban hospital assume primary responsibility for skin care, assisting patients with all levels of bathing and ADL's. Patients at risk for skin breakdown are identified through use of the Braden Scale in the automated documentation information system. A report is generated for staff, which highlights patients at risk. The wound ostomy continence nurse obtains the report, and makes rounds on patients with unit RN's and nursing assistants. Together, decisions are made regarding wound treatment, pressure relief mechanisms, and optimal preventive strategies. The patient care assistants are then able to identify skin changes and report findings to the RN when appropriate. The RN may then decide to consult with the registered dietician regarding nutritional support, or the physical therapist for assistance with ambulatory function. Outcomes: Outcome measures include a decrease in overall length of stay, and improved patient and family satisfaction with care provided. Interpretation/Conclusion: The SWAT team encourages collaborative care behaviors of all staff, and facilitates early intervention modalities to support skin integrity. Implications for Nursing Practice: Ongoing surveillance of potential skin breakdown stimulates innovative nursing practice through consultation, critical thinking and patient assessment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:40:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:40:38Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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