2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163871
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Little "Ghosts" of Ukraine
Author(s):
Storozhuk, Anna
Author Details:
Anna Storozhuk, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: storozg@mcmaster.ca
Abstract:
According to statistics, there are almost ten and a half million children under age of 18 living in Ukraine, over three hundred thousand of which are homeless. Ukraine is overwhelmed by its third wave of homelessness. However, unlike the first two waves (periods of civil war and Great Patriotic war) when children were out in the street owing to the death of their parents, the parents of present homeless children are safe and sound. There are several reasons explaining why young children end up on the streets of Ukraine, but whatever the reason, the outcomes are often devastating. In most cases circumstances are beyond youth's control, such as family violence, prejudice and assaults, push them to run away from home. 23.2% of homeless children live in railway stations, 18.2% live "somewhere", 16.4% live on garrets, basements, porches, 15.1% live in local trains. They unite into groups, and work out their own rules and habits. Almost all of them develop drug addictions, specifically to glue and other chemical substances. Jurisdictionally these children do not exist: they are not registered in Ministry of Education files, child clinics and hospitals, and they are not on government lists to receive high school certificates or internal citizenship passports. Homeless children lack jurisdictional power as they live like ghosts. Trying to earn their living in every possible way 43.4% of the children who run away go begging, 33.3% try to work, 18.2% take money from relatives and 15.7% are compelled to steal. With collaboration of international organizations, government institutions and the private sector, the number of homeless children in Ukraine has significantly decreased in last couple of years; however, this issue is still very relevant and greatly affects the lives of millions of Ukrainians.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Little "Ghosts" of Ukraineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStorozhuk, Annaen_US
dc.author.detailsAnna Storozhuk, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: storozg@mcmaster.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163871-
dc.description.abstractAccording to statistics, there are almost ten and a half million children under age of 18 living in Ukraine, over three hundred thousand of which are homeless. Ukraine is overwhelmed by its third wave of homelessness. However, unlike the first two waves (periods of civil war and Great Patriotic war) when children were out in the street owing to the death of their parents, the parents of present homeless children are safe and sound. There are several reasons explaining why young children end up on the streets of Ukraine, but whatever the reason, the outcomes are often devastating. In most cases circumstances are beyond youth's control, such as family violence, prejudice and assaults, push them to run away from home. 23.2% of homeless children live in railway stations, 18.2% live "somewhere", 16.4% live on garrets, basements, porches, 15.1% live in local trains. They unite into groups, and work out their own rules and habits. Almost all of them develop drug addictions, specifically to glue and other chemical substances. Jurisdictionally these children do not exist: they are not registered in Ministry of Education files, child clinics and hospitals, and they are not on government lists to receive high school certificates or internal citizenship passports. Homeless children lack jurisdictional power as they live like ghosts. Trying to earn their living in every possible way 43.4% of the children who run away go begging, 33.3% try to work, 18.2% take money from relatives and 15.7% are compelled to steal. With collaboration of international organizations, government institutions and the private sector, the number of homeless children in Ukraine has significantly decreased in last couple of years; however, this issue is still very relevant and greatly affects the lives of millions of Ukrainians.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:00Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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