2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163875
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
U-Volunteer Project: Lessons Learned from Tsunami in Thailand
Author(s):
Sumpowthong, Kaysorn; Bumrungsakulsavat, Arajit
Author Details:
Kaysorn Sumpowthong, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Nursing, Thammasat University, Rangsit Campus, Klonglueng, Patum-Tani, Thailand, email: kaysorns@tu.ac.th; Arajit Bumrungsakulsavat
Abstract:
Background: 26 December 2004 was the first time Thailand had experienced such a brutal Tsunami. During this difficult time, there were many groups of university students in Thailand dedicated themselves to work as volunteers without funding or support from any agencies. The range of activities included delivering food and supplies, providing care and counselling and doing whatever possible to help the victims. The National Health Security of Thailand (NHST) organized a collaborative system and provided funding for this voluntary work called U-Volunteer Project. More than 5,000 volunteers from many universities in Thailand involved in this project and worked collaboratively with local representatives in helping the tsunami victims in six provinces during March and June 2005. Purpose: The study aimed to explore the effects of voluntary work conducted by university student volunteers. Methods: A qualitative technique was employed. Ten focus group discussions were carried out at the tsunami areas during April and May 2005. A purposive sampling method was applied. The participants of the focus groups were male and female university student volunteers. Themes of the focus group discussions were benefits of voluntary work, barriers to work as volunteers and learning experiences from working with people. Content analysis was applied by being based around determined themes. Results: The participants expressed their good impression in doing voluntary work. They felt proud of themselves and developed a greater understanding of the tsunami victims' need enabling them to consider the most appropriate support for the victims. Furthermore, the participants would develop public spirit, which is considered as an essential characteristic of youth. Barriers to do voluntary work were found to be bad weather, long distance traveling and poor cooperation in some areas. All these barriers were seen as good lessons learned outside universities. Conclusion: The results from this study suggest that the work of university student volunteers in the tsunami areas reflects the importance of providing an opportunity for students to learn in actual situations. It is also an effective way to develop public spirit among them.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleU-Volunteer Project: Lessons Learned from Tsunami in Thailanden_GB
dc.contributor.authorSumpowthong, Kaysornen_US
dc.contributor.authorBumrungsakulsavat, Arajiten_US
dc.author.detailsKaysorn Sumpowthong, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Nursing, Thammasat University, Rangsit Campus, Klonglueng, Patum-Tani, Thailand, email: kaysorns@tu.ac.th; Arajit Bumrungsakulsavaten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163875-
dc.description.abstractBackground: 26 December 2004 was the first time Thailand had experienced such a brutal Tsunami. During this difficult time, there were many groups of university students in Thailand dedicated themselves to work as volunteers without funding or support from any agencies. The range of activities included delivering food and supplies, providing care and counselling and doing whatever possible to help the victims. The National Health Security of Thailand (NHST) organized a collaborative system and provided funding for this voluntary work called U-Volunteer Project. More than 5,000 volunteers from many universities in Thailand involved in this project and worked collaboratively with local representatives in helping the tsunami victims in six provinces during March and June 2005. Purpose: The study aimed to explore the effects of voluntary work conducted by university student volunteers. Methods: A qualitative technique was employed. Ten focus group discussions were carried out at the tsunami areas during April and May 2005. A purposive sampling method was applied. The participants of the focus groups were male and female university student volunteers. Themes of the focus group discussions were benefits of voluntary work, barriers to work as volunteers and learning experiences from working with people. Content analysis was applied by being based around determined themes. Results: The participants expressed their good impression in doing voluntary work. They felt proud of themselves and developed a greater understanding of the tsunami victims' need enabling them to consider the most appropriate support for the victims. Furthermore, the participants would develop public spirit, which is considered as an essential characteristic of youth. Barriers to do voluntary work were found to be bad weather, long distance traveling and poor cooperation in some areas. All these barriers were seen as good lessons learned outside universities. Conclusion: The results from this study suggest that the work of university student volunteers in the tsunami areas reflects the importance of providing an opportunity for students to learn in actual situations. It is also an effective way to develop public spirit among them.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:05Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.