The Impact of Harmful Traditional Practices on the Educational Development of the Girl-Child in Nigeria

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163881
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Harmful Traditional Practices on the Educational Development of the Girl-Child in Nigeria
Author(s):
Utulu, R. E.; Utulu, S. N.
Author Details:
R. E. Utulu, PhD, Lecturer/Senior Lecturer, Department of Curriculum and Teaching, Faculty of Education, Benue State University, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria, email: ruthutulu@yahoo.com; S. N. Utulu
Abstract:
This study assessed the impact of harmful traditional practices of female genital mutilation (FGM), early marriage, child betrothal and forced marriage on the girl child in terms of her educational development. An ex post facto design was employed in the study using 548 adolescent girls between the ages of 13-18 years, both married and unmarried, in secondary schools and vocational/technical institutions in Nigeria. FGM, early marriage and forced marriage were each found to have composite impact on educational development of the girl child but not with child betrothal. Multivariate and Path analysis showed that harmful traditional practices had composite significant impact on the educational development variable of study habit but was not significant on vocational and technical skills and on motivation. There was significant impact of all independent variables (child betrothal, forced and early marriage) on the educational development measures of motivation and study habit except for FGM. The independent variables of early marriage, forced marriage and child betrothal were found not to have any significant relative impact on vocational and technical skills. The result of the path analysis showed that FGM had the highest impact followed by forced marriage and early marriage but was not significant with child betrothal on girls' educational development. The results of this study have implication in curriculum planning and implementation for practicing teachers, school authorities, guidance counselors, parents, NGO's, human rights activists and the government.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Harmful Traditional Practices on the Educational Development of the Girl-Child in Nigeriaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorUtulu, R. E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorUtulu, S. N.en_US
dc.author.detailsR. E. Utulu, PhD, Lecturer/Senior Lecturer, Department of Curriculum and Teaching, Faculty of Education, Benue State University, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria, email: ruthutulu@yahoo.com; S. N. Utuluen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163881-
dc.description.abstractThis study assessed the impact of harmful traditional practices of female genital mutilation (FGM), early marriage, child betrothal and forced marriage on the girl child in terms of her educational development. An ex post facto design was employed in the study using 548 adolescent girls between the ages of 13-18 years, both married and unmarried, in secondary schools and vocational/technical institutions in Nigeria. FGM, early marriage and forced marriage were each found to have composite impact on educational development of the girl child but not with child betrothal. Multivariate and Path analysis showed that harmful traditional practices had composite significant impact on the educational development variable of study habit but was not significant on vocational and technical skills and on motivation. There was significant impact of all independent variables (child betrothal, forced and early marriage) on the educational development measures of motivation and study habit except for FGM. The independent variables of early marriage, forced marriage and child betrothal were found not to have any significant relative impact on vocational and technical skills. The result of the path analysis showed that FGM had the highest impact followed by forced marriage and early marriage but was not significant with child betrothal on girls' educational development. The results of this study have implication in curriculum planning and implementation for practicing teachers, school authorities, guidance counselors, parents, NGO's, human rights activists and the government.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:11Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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