Building Capacity for Food Security Through Policy Change: The Canadian Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163883
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Capacity for Food Security Through Policy Change: The Canadian Experience
Author(s):
Vogel, Ellen; Williams, P.; Roberts, S.
Author Details:
Ellen Vogel, Assistant Professor, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, email: ellen.vogel@uoit.ca; P. Williams; S. Roberts
Abstract:
According to the National Population Health Study and the Canadian Community Health Survey, between 10.2% and 14% of Canadians, respectively, reported living in food insecure households. These individuals did not have enough or worried about not having enough money to buy the needed food. Those at increased risk included lone parent families, social assistance recipients, individuals who rent their dwellings and members of Aboriginal communities living off reserves. Food insecurity has far reaching impacts on children and families and ultimately, on population health. Addressing food security through (a) the formulation and approval of healthy public policy; and (b) building sustainable community-based networks for action, is a fundamental contribution to the empowerment of vulnerable women and children. This presentation will focus on a pan-Canadian, bilingual, community-based initiative that builds on the work of the Nova Scotia Nutrition Council and the Atlantic Health Promotion Research Centre. Participatory approaches to food-costing, involving women who are experiencing food insecurity, have led to the development of a workbook entitled Thought About Food?? The initiative utilizes the workbook and other national resources to enhance the capacities of staff and community partners affiliated with two federally-funded programs; namely, the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program (CPNP) and the Community Action Program for Children (CAPC). Together, they receive close to $90 million annually and fund 814 community-based projects targeting at-risk women and children. In 2005, food insecurity was identified by both as a major health issue for participants. Through the initiative, 11 Food Security Mentors affiliated with CPNP/CAPC projects across the country will receive training, skill-building and mentoring opportunities to further their work in building food security through policy change. Ongoing research utilizing participatory approaches is elucidating policy development strategies to address food insecurity as well as increasing understandings of food access determinants. Findings indicate that participatory food-costing is a springboard for building capacity for food security through policy change at the individual, community and systems levels. This presentation will illuminate promising practices to engage and build capacities within and between local, provincial, national and international communities (agencies, organizations, governing bodies) to address policies that impact on food security.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Capacity for Food Security Through Policy Change: The Canadian Experienceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVogel, Ellenen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsEllen Vogel, Assistant Professor, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, email: ellen.vogel@uoit.ca; P. Williams; S. Robertsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163883-
dc.description.abstractAccording to the National Population Health Study and the Canadian Community Health Survey, between 10.2% and 14% of Canadians, respectively, reported living in food insecure households. These individuals did not have enough or worried about not having enough money to buy the needed food. Those at increased risk included lone parent families, social assistance recipients, individuals who rent their dwellings and members of Aboriginal communities living off reserves. Food insecurity has far reaching impacts on children and families and ultimately, on population health. Addressing food security through (a) the formulation and approval of healthy public policy; and (b) building sustainable community-based networks for action, is a fundamental contribution to the empowerment of vulnerable women and children. This presentation will focus on a pan-Canadian, bilingual, community-based initiative that builds on the work of the Nova Scotia Nutrition Council and the Atlantic Health Promotion Research Centre. Participatory approaches to food-costing, involving women who are experiencing food insecurity, have led to the development of a workbook entitled Thought About Food?? The initiative utilizes the workbook and other national resources to enhance the capacities of staff and community partners affiliated with two federally-funded programs; namely, the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program (CPNP) and the Community Action Program for Children (CAPC). Together, they receive close to $90 million annually and fund 814 community-based projects targeting at-risk women and children. In 2005, food insecurity was identified by both as a major health issue for participants. Through the initiative, 11 Food Security Mentors affiliated with CPNP/CAPC projects across the country will receive training, skill-building and mentoring opportunities to further their work in building food security through policy change. Ongoing research utilizing participatory approaches is elucidating policy development strategies to address food insecurity as well as increasing understandings of food access determinants. Findings indicate that participatory food-costing is a springboard for building capacity for food security through policy change at the individual, community and systems levels. This presentation will illuminate promising practices to engage and build capacities within and between local, provincial, national and international communities (agencies, organizations, governing bodies) to address policies that impact on food security.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:14Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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