Exposure to Well-Water Arsenic and Manganese and Intellectual Function in Children in Araihazar, Bangladesh

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163884
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exposure to Well-Water Arsenic and Manganese and Intellectual Function in Children in Araihazar, Bangladesh
Author(s):
Wasserman, Gail A.; Liu, Xinhua; Parvez, Faruque; Ahsan, Habibul; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Van Green, Alexander; Slavkovich, Vesna; Lolacono, Nancy; Levy, Dianne; Cheng, Zhongqi; Zheng, Yan; Kline, Jennie; Graziano, Joseph
Author Details:
Gail A. Wasserman, B.A. Psych, M.A. Psych, Ph.D., Professor of Clinical Psychology in Child Psychiatry, Director Center for the Promotion of Mental Health in Juvenile Justice, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA, email: wassermg@childpsych.columbia.edu; Xinhua Liu; Faruque Parvez; Habibul Ahsan; Pam Factor-Litvak; Alexander Van Geen; Vesna Slavkovich; Nancy LoIacono; Dianne Levy; Zhongqi Cheng; Yan Zheng; Jennie Kline; Joseph Graziano
Abstract:
Exposure to arsenic (As) and to Mn have long been known to elicit neurotoxicity in adults, although to date there have been few well-controlled studies in children. In this study, we report results of cross-sectional investigations of intellectual function in children whose parents participate in our ongoing prospective cohort study examining health effects of arsenic exposure in 12,000 residents of Araihazar, Bangladesh. We present results for 301 6-year-olds and 201 ten year-olds whose home tubewells were found to have water As concentration ranging from .094 to 864 ?g/L (mean = 120.1 ?g/dl for 6-year olds and 117.8 ?g/dl for 10-year olds). In a third investigation, we examined 142 ten year-old children who had been consuming tube-well water with an average concentration of 793 ?g Mn/L and 3 ?g As/L. Children and mothers came to our field clinic, where children received a medical examination in which weight, height, and head circumference were measured. Children's intellectual function on tests drawn from the WISC-III (10 year olds) and WPPSI-III (6-year olds) was assessed by summing weighted items across domains to create Verbal, Performance and Full Scale raw scores. Children provided urine specimens for measuring urinary As and creatinine, and were asked to provide blood samples for measuring blood lead, arsenic, manganese and hemoglobin concentrations. For both six- and ten-year-old children, exposure to As from drinking water was associated with reduced intellectual function after adjustment for sociodemographic covariates and water Mn. For example, among 10-year-olds, water arsenic was associated with reduced intellectual function, in a dose-response fashion, such that children with water As > 50 ?g/L achieved significantly lower Performance and Full Scale scores than children with water As < 5.5 ?g/L. The association was generally stronger for well water As than for urinary As. In the third study, of Mn exposure, after adjustment for socio-demographic covariates, water Mn was associated with reduced Full Scale, Performance, and Verbal raw scores, in a dose-response fashion; for those children, the low level of As in water had no effect. Future work will examination the impact of the provision of deep tube wells, free of both As and Mn, on biological markers of As toxicity and intellectual function in 7-9 year olds.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExposure to Well-Water Arsenic and Manganese and Intellectual Function in Children in Araihazar, Bangladeshen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWasserman, Gail A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Xinhuaen_US
dc.contributor.authorParvez, Faruqueen_US
dc.contributor.authorAhsan, Habibulen_US
dc.contributor.authorFactor-Litvak, Pamen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Green, Alexanderen_US
dc.contributor.authorSlavkovich, Vesnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLolacono, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.authorLevy, Dianneen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Zhongqien_US
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Yanen_US
dc.contributor.authorKline, Jennieen_US
dc.contributor.authorGraziano, Josephen_US
dc.author.detailsGail A. Wasserman, B.A. Psych, M.A. Psych, Ph.D., Professor of Clinical Psychology in Child Psychiatry, Director Center for the Promotion of Mental Health in Juvenile Justice, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA, email: wassermg@childpsych.columbia.edu; Xinhua Liu; Faruque Parvez; Habibul Ahsan; Pam Factor-Litvak; Alexander Van Geen; Vesna Slavkovich; Nancy LoIacono; Dianne Levy; Zhongqi Cheng; Yan Zheng; Jennie Kline; Joseph Grazianoen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163884-
dc.description.abstractExposure to arsenic (As) and to Mn have long been known to elicit neurotoxicity in adults, although to date there have been few well-controlled studies in children. In this study, we report results of cross-sectional investigations of intellectual function in children whose parents participate in our ongoing prospective cohort study examining health effects of arsenic exposure in 12,000 residents of Araihazar, Bangladesh. We present results for 301 6-year-olds and 201 ten year-olds whose home tubewells were found to have water As concentration ranging from .094 to 864 ?g/L (mean = 120.1 ?g/dl for 6-year olds and 117.8 ?g/dl for 10-year olds). In a third investigation, we examined 142 ten year-old children who had been consuming tube-well water with an average concentration of 793 ?g Mn/L and 3 ?g As/L. Children and mothers came to our field clinic, where children received a medical examination in which weight, height, and head circumference were measured. Children's intellectual function on tests drawn from the WISC-III (10 year olds) and WPPSI-III (6-year olds) was assessed by summing weighted items across domains to create Verbal, Performance and Full Scale raw scores. Children provided urine specimens for measuring urinary As and creatinine, and were asked to provide blood samples for measuring blood lead, arsenic, manganese and hemoglobin concentrations. For both six- and ten-year-old children, exposure to As from drinking water was associated with reduced intellectual function after adjustment for sociodemographic covariates and water Mn. For example, among 10-year-olds, water arsenic was associated with reduced intellectual function, in a dose-response fashion, such that children with water As &gt; 50 ?g/L achieved significantly lower Performance and Full Scale scores than children with water As < 5.5 ?g/L. The association was generally stronger for well water As than for urinary As. In the third study, of Mn exposure, after adjustment for socio-demographic covariates, water Mn was associated with reduced Full Scale, Performance, and Verbal raw scores, in a dose-response fashion; for those children, the low level of As in water had no effect. Future work will examination the impact of the provision of deep tube wells, free of both As and Mn, on biological markers of As toxicity and intellectual function in 7-9 year olds.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:15Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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