Modeling, Messaging, Relationships, and Positive Attitude Towards Smoking in Non-Smoking Adolescent Females

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163887
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Modeling, Messaging, Relationships, and Positive Attitude Towards Smoking in Non-Smoking Adolescent Females
Author(s):
Woods, Pat
Author Details:
Pat Woods, RN, MScN, Instructor, Department of Nursing, Langara College, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: pwoods@langara.bc.ca
Abstract:
Preventing smoking behaviour among adolescent females is a significant global health issue as females have many gender-specific health risks related to smoking. The development of a positive attitude (PA) toward smoking is currently theorized as the first stage of smoking behaviour. The study examined whether modeling, messaging, and relationship factors are associated with PA in non-smoking adolescent females. The research was guided by Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory of behavior. The study (N=1345) utilized a subset of data from the BCYSOSH, a 2001/2002 cross-sectional, school-based study of adolescents. Modeling factors included smoking mother, father, sibling, boy/girl friend and best friend. The two parental anti-smoking messages included were 'won't allow me' and 'warned me about the dangers'. Maternal closeness, paternal closeness and the Psychological Control Scale Youth Self Report (PCS-YSR) were used as measures of the quality of the relationship with parents. Hierarchical regression results indicated that smoking by the father, boy/girlfriend and best friend were significantly associated with PA toward smoking in non-smoking adolescent females. However, only smoking by a boy/girlfriend remained significantly associated to PA when the parental messages and relationship factors were added to the regression model. Both parental messages were associated with PA toward smoking. A previously unreported finding was that the parental warning about the dangers of smoking was associated with a decrease in PA while the parents' not allowing smoking behaviour was associated with an increase in PA. Parental control was also significantly associated with PA. The results from this study highlight the need to include consideration of parental factors in designing smoking prevention programs. Interventions that rely on social modeling influences while ignoring the quality of the parent-adolescent relationship and parental anti-smoking messages as interrelated social factors may not be effective in decreasing the female adolescent smoking rate.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleModeling, Messaging, Relationships, and Positive Attitude Towards Smoking in Non-Smoking Adolescent Femalesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWoods, Paten_US
dc.author.detailsPat Woods, RN, MScN, Instructor, Department of Nursing, Langara College, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: pwoods@langara.bc.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163887-
dc.description.abstractPreventing smoking behaviour among adolescent females is a significant global health issue as females have many gender-specific health risks related to smoking. The development of a positive attitude (PA) toward smoking is currently theorized as the first stage of smoking behaviour. The study examined whether modeling, messaging, and relationship factors are associated with PA in non-smoking adolescent females. The research was guided by Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory of behavior. The study (N=1345) utilized a subset of data from the BCYSOSH, a 2001/2002 cross-sectional, school-based study of adolescents. Modeling factors included smoking mother, father, sibling, boy/girl friend and best friend. The two parental anti-smoking messages included were 'won't allow me' and 'warned me about the dangers'. Maternal closeness, paternal closeness and the Psychological Control Scale Youth Self Report (PCS-YSR) were used as measures of the quality of the relationship with parents. Hierarchical regression results indicated that smoking by the father, boy/girlfriend and best friend were significantly associated with PA toward smoking in non-smoking adolescent females. However, only smoking by a boy/girlfriend remained significantly associated to PA when the parental messages and relationship factors were added to the regression model. Both parental messages were associated with PA toward smoking. A previously unreported finding was that the parental warning about the dangers of smoking was associated with a decrease in PA while the parents' not allowing smoking behaviour was associated with an increase in PA. Parental control was also significantly associated with PA. The results from this study highlight the need to include consideration of parental factors in designing smoking prevention programs. Interventions that rely on social modeling influences while ignoring the quality of the parent-adolescent relationship and parental anti-smoking messages as interrelated social factors may not be effective in decreasing the female adolescent smoking rate.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:18Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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