Women's Silence in Childbirth Experience: Are Women Deprived of their Rights to Access Emergency Obstetric Care?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163898
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Silence in Childbirth Experience: Are Women Deprived of their Rights to Access Emergency Obstetric Care?
Author(s):
Afsana, Kaosar
Author Details:
Kaosar Afsana, Program Manager, BRAC Health Program, Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: afsana.k@brac.net
Abstract:
Women's silence during childbirth experiences may result in fatal consequences. This paper explored why and how women in rural Bangladesh remain silent during their birth experiences that affected their rights to access emergency obstetric care. It was based on ethnographic research that included interviews and observations of birth events at home and in hospitals. Women's silence was evident in all aspects of the childbirth experience - in giving birth at home and in the hospital. At home, rural women remained silent when they developed labor pain. There was a saying in the village: Joto rao hobe, toto deri hobe baccha houne aar toto koshto hobe - the more people talk about the birth event, the more time it requires and the more suffering occurs in giving birth. The tradition of maintaining silence kept the issues of obstructed labor and other complications hidden and impeded transfer of life threatening cases to hospital. In hospital birth experiences, women had little role to play but to silently accept and conform to whatever happened to their body. They accepted hospital treatment or care regardless of quality without saying a word. On occasion, they denied the rules of medical treatment. Silence is expressed in resistance that includes non-cooperation, denial of treatment and ultimately, refusal of hospital care. The analysis revealed that in indigenous birth, women remain silent by adopting gendered characteristics - sharam (modesty and shyness), patience and tolerance imposed by traditional societal values. In hospital birth, women are made silent by the disciplining power of authoritative hospital obstetrics where the female body becomes the place of contestations of bio-power. As a consequence of their silence, women risk suffering and possible death, no matter where birth takes place. One of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) is to reduce maternal mortality. To achieve the MDGs for maternal health, it is crucial to break women's silence during childbirth by addressing values of both traditional systems and modern, technological systems, and to establish women's rights to access quality obstetric care in time.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Silence in Childbirth Experience: Are Women Deprived of their Rights to Access Emergency Obstetric Care?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAfsana, Kaosaren_US
dc.author.detailsKaosar Afsana, Program Manager, BRAC Health Program, Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: afsana.k@brac.neten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163898-
dc.description.abstractWomen's silence during childbirth experiences may result in fatal consequences. This paper explored why and how women in rural Bangladesh remain silent during their birth experiences that affected their rights to access emergency obstetric care. It was based on ethnographic research that included interviews and observations of birth events at home and in hospitals. Women's silence was evident in all aspects of the childbirth experience - in giving birth at home and in the hospital. At home, rural women remained silent when they developed labor pain. There was a saying in the village: Joto rao hobe, toto deri hobe baccha houne aar toto koshto hobe - the more people talk about the birth event, the more time it requires and the more suffering occurs in giving birth. The tradition of maintaining silence kept the issues of obstructed labor and other complications hidden and impeded transfer of life threatening cases to hospital. In hospital birth experiences, women had little role to play but to silently accept and conform to whatever happened to their body. They accepted hospital treatment or care regardless of quality without saying a word. On occasion, they denied the rules of medical treatment. Silence is expressed in resistance that includes non-cooperation, denial of treatment and ultimately, refusal of hospital care. The analysis revealed that in indigenous birth, women remain silent by adopting gendered characteristics - sharam (modesty and shyness), patience and tolerance imposed by traditional societal values. In hospital birth, women are made silent by the disciplining power of authoritative hospital obstetrics where the female body becomes the place of contestations of bio-power. As a consequence of their silence, women risk suffering and possible death, no matter where birth takes place. One of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) is to reduce maternal mortality. To achieve the MDGs for maternal health, it is crucial to break women's silence during childbirth by addressing values of both traditional systems and modern, technological systems, and to establish women's rights to access quality obstetric care in time.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:31Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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