Domestic violence in health policy of Bangladesh: Are women's rights to health care violated?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163899
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Domestic violence in health policy of Bangladesh: Are women's rights to health care violated?
Author(s):
Afsana, Kaosar; Rashid, Sabina; Thurston, Wilfreda
Author Details:
Kaosar Afsana, Program Manager, BRAC Health Program, Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: afsana.k@brac.net; Sabina Rashid; Wilfreda Thurston
Abstract:
This research explores the extent to which domestic violence is addressed as a women's health issue in the National Health Policy of Bangladesh. We reviewed country level health policies and plans for the next five years and interviewed policy-makers, service providers, health care professionals, lawyers, police force and female victims. After the International conference on population and development in Cairo and Women's conference in Beijing, much emphasis has been placed on violence issues in Bangladesh. However, domestic violence and its impact on women's health were not addressed as a discrete issue at the policy level. More importantly, the National Health Policy did not state clearly how violence against women would be addressed, not to mention women's domestic violence. In recent years the one stop crisis centre operating under the Ministry of Women and Child affairs had been in place in two tertiary hospitals in Bangladesh. The centre offered medical treatment for the immediate problems of domestic violence and arranged legal and social support for abused women, but, they did not offer programs for violence prevention. Their working relationship with NGOs influenced the latter to send cases from far-off villages. Yet, reaching a population of 140 million through two State-run centres raised questions about its effectiveness. Many NGOs relied on each other to assist abused women, but critical gaps existed in overall coordination. Common barriers in this sector are: absence of government's concrete policies for domestic violence and women's health; lack of understanding or sensitivity to gender based violence and women's health; insufficient laws on domestic violence; short-term, donor-driven project; inadequate safety and security of victims and workers; limited communications between government and non-government agencies; lack of shelter homes; inadequate support for counselling; and lack of awareness of health providers, police, lawyers and other staff. The overall situation shows how women's rights to health care in critical situations are violated in absence of concrete policy and effective planning for addressing domestic violence and women's health. To improve this situation, it is crucial to bring about better policies, strategies and programs for domestic violence and women's health.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDomestic violence in health policy of Bangladesh: Are women's rights to health care violated?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAfsana, Kaosaren_US
dc.contributor.authorRashid, Sabinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorThurston, Wilfredaen_US
dc.author.detailsKaosar Afsana, Program Manager, BRAC Health Program, Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: afsana.k@brac.net; Sabina Rashid; Wilfreda Thurstonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163899-
dc.description.abstractThis research explores the extent to which domestic violence is addressed as a women's health issue in the National Health Policy of Bangladesh. We reviewed country level health policies and plans for the next five years and interviewed policy-makers, service providers, health care professionals, lawyers, police force and female victims. After the International conference on population and development in Cairo and Women's conference in Beijing, much emphasis has been placed on violence issues in Bangladesh. However, domestic violence and its impact on women's health were not addressed as a discrete issue at the policy level. More importantly, the National Health Policy did not state clearly how violence against women would be addressed, not to mention women's domestic violence. In recent years the one stop crisis centre operating under the Ministry of Women and Child affairs had been in place in two tertiary hospitals in Bangladesh. The centre offered medical treatment for the immediate problems of domestic violence and arranged legal and social support for abused women, but, they did not offer programs for violence prevention. Their working relationship with NGOs influenced the latter to send cases from far-off villages. Yet, reaching a population of 140 million through two State-run centres raised questions about its effectiveness. Many NGOs relied on each other to assist abused women, but critical gaps existed in overall coordination. Common barriers in this sector are: absence of government's concrete policies for domestic violence and women's health; lack of understanding or sensitivity to gender based violence and women's health; insufficient laws on domestic violence; short-term, donor-driven project; inadequate safety and security of victims and workers; limited communications between government and non-government agencies; lack of shelter homes; inadequate support for counselling; and lack of awareness of health providers, police, lawyers and other staff. The overall situation shows how women's rights to health care in critical situations are violated in absence of concrete policy and effective planning for addressing domestic violence and women's health. To improve this situation, it is crucial to bring about better policies, strategies and programs for domestic violence and women's health.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:32Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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