Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD): Examining an Indigenous Community-Based, Participatory Research Approach to Reduce Alcohol Use During Pregnancy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163900
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD): Examining an Indigenous Community-Based, Participatory Research Approach to Reduce Alcohol Use During Pregnancy
Author(s):
George, Anne M.; Ranford, Jennifer; MacLeod, Stuart M.; Masotti, Paul; Loock, C. A.; Morton, Michel; Van Bibber, Marilyn; Fleming, Mike
Author Details:
Anne M. George, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: ageorge@cw.bc.ca; Jennifer Ranford; Stuart M. MacLeod; Paul Masotti; C. A. Loock; Michel Morton; Marilyn Van Bibber; Mike Fleming
Abstract:
Purpose: This paper describes a Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) prevention project entitled Healthy Communities, Mothers and Children (HCMC). HCMC is a collaborative research partnership between university researchers from Canada and the U.S.A. and four indigenous Canadian communities. The goal of HCMC is to reduce the incidence of FASD. The objective is the community-driven development of culturally appropriate and community-specific initiatives at each site. HCMC uses a community-based participatory research approach in indigenous communities located in both rural and urban areas, including any disadvantaged area of a large city. Both indigenous and academic knowledge were utilized in developing prevention strategies over a 3-year project. The solutions were directed exclusively by each community, with the university researchers acting in a supportive capacity. Background: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder is a general term used to describe the broad range of birth defects resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure. It includes the most severely affected individuals, who have Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), and others who have similar alcohol-related damage. Prenatal alcohol exposure may cause physical as well as neurological damage. It is the leading cause of preventable birth defects; with an estimated incidence rate of 9.1/1000 live births. Affected children often require considerable healthcare, educational and social service resources. Preventing FASD is a public health priority, given its high human, social and economic costs. The incidences of FASD can be reduced if environmental and personal conditions are put in place to support women at risk for heavy alcohol use during pregnancy. Design: The research involved bi-directional capacity-building between university and community partners. Results: Each community independently developed a locally acceptable model. Their strategies identified supportive people to work with women at risk for further drinking, the training required for these support workers, methods for discussing alcohol drinking and how the women themselves will be involved in the process. Conclusion: The development of FASD prevention strategies which engage indigenous community members, service providers, and the target population may improve their effectiveness. Moreover, this research will help build and contribute to a strong evidence base for FASD community-based prevention strategies, and may be a model for addressing other public health concerns.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD): Examining an Indigenous Community-Based, Participatory Research Approach to Reduce Alcohol Use During Pregnancyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Anne M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRanford, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorMacLeod, Stuart M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMasotti, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.authorLoock, C. A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMorton, Michelen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Bibber, Marilynen_US
dc.contributor.authorFleming, Mikeen_US
dc.author.detailsAnne M. George, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: ageorge@cw.bc.ca; Jennifer Ranford; Stuart M. MacLeod; Paul Masotti; C. A. Loock; Michel Morton; Marilyn Van Bibber; Mike Flemingen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163900-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This paper describes a Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) prevention project entitled Healthy Communities, Mothers and Children (HCMC). HCMC is a collaborative research partnership between university researchers from Canada and the U.S.A. and four indigenous Canadian communities. The goal of HCMC is to reduce the incidence of FASD. The objective is the community-driven development of culturally appropriate and community-specific initiatives at each site. HCMC uses a community-based participatory research approach in indigenous communities located in both rural and urban areas, including any disadvantaged area of a large city. Both indigenous and academic knowledge were utilized in developing prevention strategies over a 3-year project. The solutions were directed exclusively by each community, with the university researchers acting in a supportive capacity. Background: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder is a general term used to describe the broad range of birth defects resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure. It includes the most severely affected individuals, who have Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), and others who have similar alcohol-related damage. Prenatal alcohol exposure may cause physical as well as neurological damage. It is the leading cause of preventable birth defects; with an estimated incidence rate of 9.1/1000 live births. Affected children often require considerable healthcare, educational and social service resources. Preventing FASD is a public health priority, given its high human, social and economic costs. The incidences of FASD can be reduced if environmental and personal conditions are put in place to support women at risk for heavy alcohol use during pregnancy. Design: The research involved bi-directional capacity-building between university and community partners. Results: Each community independently developed a locally acceptable model. Their strategies identified supportive people to work with women at risk for further drinking, the training required for these support workers, methods for discussing alcohol drinking and how the women themselves will be involved in the process. Conclusion: The development of FASD prevention strategies which engage indigenous community members, service providers, and the target population may improve their effectiveness. Moreover, this research will help build and contribute to a strong evidence base for FASD community-based prevention strategies, and may be a model for addressing other public health concerns.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:33Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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