2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163911
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Tuberculosis in Women - Issues and Possible Interventions
Author(s):
Aparna, Srikantam; Reddy, G. Raj Gopal; Seth, Sonia; Murthy, K. V. Krishna
Author Details:
Srikantam Aparna, PhD, Group Leader - Microbiology, Blue Peter Research Centre, LEPRA Society, Cherlapally, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India, email: aparna@bprc-lepraindia.org; Dr. G. Raj Gopal Reddy; Dr. Sonia Seth; Dr. K. V. Krishna Murthy
Abstract:
Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB) affects mostly the young men and women. Over 900 million women are infected and one million die every year with TB worldwide. Affected women are in the most critical years when they raise children, work, and are economically productive. Though TB detection rates seem higher in men than in women, the real situation does not reflect this. It is now widely recognized that lower prevalence rates of TB in women is the result of under reporting of infected cases. Reasons are the social stigma attached to TB and restricted access for women to health services. TB control programmes thus need to be addressing the gender specific problems involved. Present study is aimed at studying the incidence of tuberculosis in women population in a revised national TB control programme (RNTCP) with a special attention to the problems involved in the control of tuberculosis in women. Methodology: TB cases registered under the RNTCP of Blue Peter Research Center and Dhoolpet Leprosy research Center of LEPRA Society, between January 2004 and September 2005 were studied. The issues studied were awareness about the symptoms, health seeking behaviour, diagnosis, initiation of treatment and adherence to the treatment. Out of 1316 chest symptomatics examined, men were more (73 %) and women were less (27%). TB was diagnosed amongst 31.5% (304/963) of men and 58.5% (206/353) amongst the women. Cure rate was 94% for women and 87.9% for men. Treatment defaulters were 0.7% (1/135) among women and 6% (10/166) among men. Conclusion: Awareness about symptoms of TB in general was less among women than men. Women have less health seeking behaviour as far as TB is concerned. Adherence to treatment was better amongst the women. Further research is needed to address the problems like lack of awareness, access to health services and considering the community based active case finding. Empowering poor women with health knowledge and providing them with more convenient access to resources on a sustainable basis would go a long way to address these problems involved in the gender disparities in tuberculosis control.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTuberculosis in Women - Issues and Possible Interventionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAparna, Srikantamen_US
dc.contributor.authorReddy, G. Raj Gopalen_US
dc.contributor.authorSeth, Soniaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurthy, K. V. Krishnaen_US
dc.author.detailsSrikantam Aparna, PhD, Group Leader - Microbiology, Blue Peter Research Centre, LEPRA Society, Cherlapally, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India, email: aparna@bprc-lepraindia.org; Dr. G. Raj Gopal Reddy; Dr. Sonia Seth; Dr. K. V. Krishna Murthyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163911-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Tuberculosis (TB) affects mostly the young men and women. Over 900 million women are infected and one million die every year with TB worldwide. Affected women are in the most critical years when they raise children, work, and are economically productive. Though TB detection rates seem higher in men than in women, the real situation does not reflect this. It is now widely recognized that lower prevalence rates of TB in women is the result of under reporting of infected cases. Reasons are the social stigma attached to TB and restricted access for women to health services. TB control programmes thus need to be addressing the gender specific problems involved. Present study is aimed at studying the incidence of tuberculosis in women population in a revised national TB control programme (RNTCP) with a special attention to the problems involved in the control of tuberculosis in women. Methodology: TB cases registered under the RNTCP of Blue Peter Research Center and Dhoolpet Leprosy research Center of LEPRA Society, between January 2004 and September 2005 were studied. The issues studied were awareness about the symptoms, health seeking behaviour, diagnosis, initiation of treatment and adherence to the treatment. Out of 1316 chest symptomatics examined, men were more (73 %) and women were less (27%). TB was diagnosed amongst 31.5% (304/963) of men and 58.5% (206/353) amongst the women. Cure rate was 94% for women and 87.9% for men. Treatment defaulters were 0.7% (1/135) among women and 6% (10/166) among men. Conclusion: Awareness about symptoms of TB in general was less among women than men. Women have less health seeking behaviour as far as TB is concerned. Adherence to treatment was better amongst the women. Further research is needed to address the problems like lack of awareness, access to health services and considering the community based active case finding. Empowering poor women with health knowledge and providing them with more convenient access to resources on a sustainable basis would go a long way to address these problems involved in the gender disparities in tuberculosis control.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:45Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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