Redefining Through Repositioning: Women Challenging Violence Through Local Actions, Global Thoughts

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163913
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Redefining Through Repositioning: Women Challenging Violence Through Local Actions, Global Thoughts
Author(s):
Arras, Isela; Wright, Chris
Author Details:
Isela Arras, Battered Immigrant Women Project Coordinator, Kentucky Domestic Violence Association, Frankfort, Kentucky, USA, email: iarras@kdva.org; Chris Wright
Abstract:
Purpose: To understand the 'sphere of influence' in relation to 'culture'. The power and control wheel was created from local women's experiences with domestic violence in Duluth, Minnesota. Our presentation places the wheel's concepts in a global context. These concepts apply to the larger societal theaters of terrorism, war and violence. Martin Luther King defined violence as, 'anything that denies human integrity and leads to hopelessness and helplessness.' This understanding of violence encompasses the global oppression of women. The model's perspective makes patterns of unequal relationships in the world community, specifically violence against women, visible to state, federal, and world acts. Policies of violence include war, economic sanctions, monetary manipulation and terrorism. These contribute to continued hegemony, country-wide or gender-specific; together, each perpetuates lack of opportunities and violent impositions in women's lives. We know that state, national and international strategies diminish the power of an individual to act as agents of change. We reject this, recognizing education as a primary antidote. Education includes community and university experiences, collective knowledge and personal wisdom. However, for us, education happens consciously, constantly exposing ourselves to "the other" through such acts: reading different newspapers and changing radio dials. Educating ourselves in these ways, forces a decision. Are we victims of violence? Are we bystanders? Do we see ourselves as possible agents of change? Arundhati Roy indicates that there is no middle ground. She challenges "...you could, like me, be unfortunate enough to stumble on a silent war. The trouble is that once you see it, you can't unsee it. And once you've seen it, keeping quiet, saying nothing becomes as political an act as speaking out. There's no innocence."
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRedefining Through Repositioning: Women Challenging Violence Through Local Actions, Global Thoughtsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArras, Iselaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWright, Chrisen_US
dc.author.detailsIsela Arras, Battered Immigrant Women Project Coordinator, Kentucky Domestic Violence Association, Frankfort, Kentucky, USA, email: iarras@kdva.org; Chris Wrighten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163913-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To understand the 'sphere of influence' in relation to 'culture'. The power and control wheel was created from local women's experiences with domestic violence in Duluth, Minnesota. Our presentation places the wheel's concepts in a global context. These concepts apply to the larger societal theaters of terrorism, war and violence. Martin Luther King defined violence as, 'anything that denies human integrity and leads to hopelessness and helplessness.' This understanding of violence encompasses the global oppression of women. The model's perspective makes patterns of unequal relationships in the world community, specifically violence against women, visible to state, federal, and world acts. Policies of violence include war, economic sanctions, monetary manipulation and terrorism. These contribute to continued hegemony, country-wide or gender-specific; together, each perpetuates lack of opportunities and violent impositions in women's lives. We know that state, national and international strategies diminish the power of an individual to act as agents of change. We reject this, recognizing education as a primary antidote. Education includes community and university experiences, collective knowledge and personal wisdom. However, for us, education happens consciously, constantly exposing ourselves to "the other" through such acts: reading different newspapers and changing radio dials. Educating ourselves in these ways, forces a decision. Are we victims of violence? Are we bystanders? Do we see ourselves as possible agents of change? Arundhati Roy indicates that there is no middle ground. She challenges "...you could, like me, be unfortunate enough to stumble on a silent war. The trouble is that once you see it, you can't unsee it. And once you've seen it, keeping quiet, saying nothing becomes as political an act as speaking out. There's no innocence."en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:47Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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