2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163914
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Tsunami: A Natural Disaster or Green House Effect?
Author(s):
Azeem, Maleeha
Author Details:
Maleeha Azeem, MPH Student, State University of Bangladesh, Dhanmondi, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: azeems@accesstel.net
Abstract:
Purpose: To determine whether tsunamis are natural disasters or a result of the greenhouse effect by addressing issues related to its cause, characteristics and damaging affects. Background: The phenomenon called a tsunami is a series of large waves with a long wavelength and period generated by a violent, impulsive undersea disturbance near the coast or in the ocean. When a sudden displacement of a large volume of water occurs, or if the sea floor is suddenly raised, big tsunami waves are formed by forces of gravity. Waves can be extremely damaging when they reach shores. Most destructive tsunamis are generated from large, shallow earthquakes with epicenters or fault lines near or on ocean floor. These usually occur in regions of the earth characterized by tectonic subduction along tectonic plate boundaries. When these plates move past each other, they cause large earthquakes, which tilt, displacing large areas of ocean floor. Sudden vertical displacements over such large areas, disturb the ocean's surface, displace water, and generate a tsunami. Are tsunamis natural calamities? Yes, firstly because they are outcomes of natural disasters like earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, submarine landslides and underwater slumps. Secondly, they can occur in inland seas and large bodies of water too. Thirdly, the occurrence of a tsunami has a periodicity. Fourthly, tsunamis arrive as many successive, highly destructive, run up waves carrying tremendous energy on an entire column of water. Fifthly a tsunami takes its toll through inundation, the impact of waves on structures and the erosion as water recedes. Are tsunamis the result of the greenhouse effect? No, because the greenhouse effect has no relevance to aforementioned five facts. CFC, CO2, Methane and other gaseous discards of modern day civilization lead to the erosion of the ozone layer in the atmosphere that surrounds and protects the Earth from the UV rays of sun. As a consequence there is a gradual built up of heat in Earth's atmosphere over centuries, leading to the progressive but slow melting of ice and snow on mountaintops and poles. As a result the sea water level is surging at an unstoppable but insidious speed. Finally, low lying deltas like Bangladesh and atolls like Maldives may be submerged permanently under seawater.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTsunami: A Natural Disaster or Green House Effect?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAzeem, Maleehaen_US
dc.author.detailsMaleeha Azeem, MPH Student, State University of Bangladesh, Dhanmondi, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: azeems@accesstel.neten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163914-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To determine whether tsunamis are natural disasters or a result of the greenhouse effect by addressing issues related to its cause, characteristics and damaging affects. Background: The phenomenon called a tsunami is a series of large waves with a long wavelength and period generated by a violent, impulsive undersea disturbance near the coast or in the ocean. When a sudden displacement of a large volume of water occurs, or if the sea floor is suddenly raised, big tsunami waves are formed by forces of gravity. Waves can be extremely damaging when they reach shores. Most destructive tsunamis are generated from large, shallow earthquakes with epicenters or fault lines near or on ocean floor. These usually occur in regions of the earth characterized by tectonic subduction along tectonic plate boundaries. When these plates move past each other, they cause large earthquakes, which tilt, displacing large areas of ocean floor. Sudden vertical displacements over such large areas, disturb the ocean's surface, displace water, and generate a tsunami. Are tsunamis natural calamities? Yes, firstly because they are outcomes of natural disasters like earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, submarine landslides and underwater slumps. Secondly, they can occur in inland seas and large bodies of water too. Thirdly, the occurrence of a tsunami has a periodicity. Fourthly, tsunamis arrive as many successive, highly destructive, run up waves carrying tremendous energy on an entire column of water. Fifthly a tsunami takes its toll through inundation, the impact of waves on structures and the erosion as water recedes. Are tsunamis the result of the greenhouse effect? No, because the greenhouse effect has no relevance to aforementioned five facts. CFC, CO2, Methane and other gaseous discards of modern day civilization lead to the erosion of the ozone layer in the atmosphere that surrounds and protects the Earth from the UV rays of sun. As a consequence there is a gradual built up of heat in Earth's atmosphere over centuries, leading to the progressive but slow melting of ice and snow on mountaintops and poles. As a result the sea water level is surging at an unstoppable but insidious speed. Finally, low lying deltas like Bangladesh and atolls like Maldives may be submerged permanently under seawater.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:48Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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