2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163915
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sex Selection- Phenomenon of Missing Girls
Author(s):
Bali-Mahabal, Kamayani
Author Details:
Kamayani Bali-Mahabal, Senior Research Officer, Centre for Enquiry into Health and Allied Themes (CEHAT), Vakola Santacruz East, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India email: kamayani_@yahoo.com
Abstract:
Purpose: To explore the legacy of continuing declining sex ratio in India, which has taken a new turn with the new and widespread use of reproductive technologies (NRTs). The 2001 Census of India reveals a child sex ratio of 927 women for 1000 men. This paper will analyze several aspects of the NRT medical technologies and their relationship to biased conclusions of race, sex, and ability. Focusing on how contemporary science and technology are reshaping and how the practice of sex selection is executed and justified, the paper would also look into Policies and Law. How far has the Legislation of PCPNDT Act been successful to control the menace, and what strategies need to be adopted for balancing the sex ratio? Background: Discrimination against girl children has a long history in India, manifesting in son preference, decline in child sex ratios, high female mortality, female infanticide and sex selection. Patriarchal gender norms and differential gender value systems contribute to strong prejudices against girls, rendering women faceless, and, to the denial of reproductive rights of women and the rights of the girl child. Sex selection has to be seen primarily as a problem created by the medico-technological approach to population control. The current population control strategy of enforcing the two-child norm with disincentives is likely to intensify son preference and sex selection. Consumerist Culture oriented economic development, commercialization of the medical profession and sexist biases in our society, combined together have created a sad scenario of 'missing girls'. Results: The rise in the practice of sex selection has to be seen as part of the continuum of violence against women at home and in public spaces in the form of dowry-related violence (including dowry deaths), honour killings and domestic violence. Challenging the legitimacy of market forces and professional interests, which thrive on the growth of such technologies, and demystifying the true essence of the practices these generate is crucial in this regard. Exposing the myths, which sustain these technologies, and the practices, which follow their use then, is the most urgent need of our times.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSex Selection- Phenomenon of Missing Girlsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBali-Mahabal, Kamayanien_US
dc.author.detailsKamayani Bali-Mahabal, Senior Research Officer, Centre for Enquiry into Health and Allied Themes (CEHAT), Vakola Santacruz East, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India email: kamayani_@yahoo.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163915-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To explore the legacy of continuing declining sex ratio in India, which has taken a new turn with the new and widespread use of reproductive technologies (NRTs). The 2001 Census of India reveals a child sex ratio of 927 women for 1000 men. This paper will analyze several aspects of the NRT medical technologies and their relationship to biased conclusions of race, sex, and ability. Focusing on how contemporary science and technology are reshaping and how the practice of sex selection is executed and justified, the paper would also look into Policies and Law. How far has the Legislation of PCPNDT Act been successful to control the menace, and what strategies need to be adopted for balancing the sex ratio? Background: Discrimination against girl children has a long history in India, manifesting in son preference, decline in child sex ratios, high female mortality, female infanticide and sex selection. Patriarchal gender norms and differential gender value systems contribute to strong prejudices against girls, rendering women faceless, and, to the denial of reproductive rights of women and the rights of the girl child. Sex selection has to be seen primarily as a problem created by the medico-technological approach to population control. The current population control strategy of enforcing the two-child norm with disincentives is likely to intensify son preference and sex selection. Consumerist Culture oriented economic development, commercialization of the medical profession and sexist biases in our society, combined together have created a sad scenario of 'missing girls'. Results: The rise in the practice of sex selection has to be seen as part of the continuum of violence against women at home and in public spaces in the form of dowry-related violence (including dowry deaths), honour killings and domestic violence. Challenging the legitimacy of market forces and professional interests, which thrive on the growth of such technologies, and demystifying the true essence of the practices these generate is crucial in this regard. Exposing the myths, which sustain these technologies, and the practices, which follow their use then, is the most urgent need of our times.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:49Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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