2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163916
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Never Alone: Family Support of Punjabi Women with Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Balneaves, Lynda G.; Bottorff, Joan L.; Naidu, Mita; Grewal, Suki K.; Johnson, Joy L.; Howard, Fuchsia A.
Author Details:
Lynda G. Balneaves, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: balneaves@nursing.ubc.ca; Joan L. Bottorff; Mita Naidu; Suki K. Grewal; Joy L. Johnson; Fuchsia A. Howard
Abstract:
Introduction: Breast cancer is an important health issue within the immigrant Punjabi community in Canada. Research exploring the family context of breast cancer has focused primarily on mainstream women and their families. Little is known of how family members of under served, ethno-cultural women respond and support women in coping with their breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. Purpose: To examine the experiences and responses of family members of immigrant Punjabi women with breast cancer. Methods: In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted with 18 family members and 19 women diagnosed with breast cancer. All interviews were tape-recorded, translated into English, and transcribed. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis grounded in the ethnographic tradition. Summary of Results: The diagnosis of breast cancer caused shock and fear among family members. The worry experienced by families was heightened by the belief that cancer was a fatal disease and unfamiliarity with the Western health care system. Despite their emotional reactions to the women's cancer diagnosis, family members were expected to fulfill their duty of caring for their ill relative. Six main support strategies were described. Family members offered women Practical Support, including performing household chores, driving women to appointments, and taking care of their children. Families also used the strategy, Coping through Faith, to strengthen women's courage in the face of their illness and to encourage the women to pray. Positive Talk was an additional strategy used by family members to provide constant reassurance, offer examples of women who survived cancer, and discourage sadness. Family members were active in Advocating on Behalf of Women in their interactions with health professionals. Given the stigma and silence surrounding breast cancer, family members took responsibility for Monitoring the Disclosure and Discussion of Breast Cancer within the family, community and between health professionals and the women. Lastly, families were committed to Never Leaving the Women Alone to ensure they were constantly monitored and kept safe. Conclusion: Breast cancer is a family experience within the immigrant Punjabi community. These findings provide a foundation for culturally appropriate interventions for Punjabi women that acknowledge the important supportive role played by family members.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNever Alone: Family Support of Punjabi Women with Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorBalneaves, Lynda G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBottorff, Joan L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNaidu, Mitaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrewal, Suki K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Joy L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Fuchsia A.en_US
dc.author.detailsLynda G. Balneaves, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: balneaves@nursing.ubc.ca; Joan L. Bottorff; Mita Naidu; Suki K. Grewal; Joy L. Johnson; Fuchsia A. Howarden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163916-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Breast cancer is an important health issue within the immigrant Punjabi community in Canada. Research exploring the family context of breast cancer has focused primarily on mainstream women and their families. Little is known of how family members of under served, ethno-cultural women respond and support women in coping with their breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. Purpose: To examine the experiences and responses of family members of immigrant Punjabi women with breast cancer. Methods: In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted with 18 family members and 19 women diagnosed with breast cancer. All interviews were tape-recorded, translated into English, and transcribed. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis grounded in the ethnographic tradition. Summary of Results: The diagnosis of breast cancer caused shock and fear among family members. The worry experienced by families was heightened by the belief that cancer was a fatal disease and unfamiliarity with the Western health care system. Despite their emotional reactions to the women's cancer diagnosis, family members were expected to fulfill their duty of caring for their ill relative. Six main support strategies were described. Family members offered women Practical Support, including performing household chores, driving women to appointments, and taking care of their children. Families also used the strategy, Coping through Faith, to strengthen women's courage in the face of their illness and to encourage the women to pray. Positive Talk was an additional strategy used by family members to provide constant reassurance, offer examples of women who survived cancer, and discourage sadness. Family members were active in Advocating on Behalf of Women in their interactions with health professionals. Given the stigma and silence surrounding breast cancer, family members took responsibility for Monitoring the Disclosure and Discussion of Breast Cancer within the family, community and between health professionals and the women. Lastly, families were committed to Never Leaving the Women Alone to ensure they were constantly monitored and kept safe. Conclusion: Breast cancer is a family experience within the immigrant Punjabi community. These findings provide a foundation for culturally appropriate interventions for Punjabi women that acknowledge the important supportive role played by family members.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:51Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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