Health Beliefs and Behaviours of Immigrant South Asian Women: A Canadian Research Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163917
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Beliefs and Behaviours of Immigrant South Asian Women: A Canadian Research Program
Author(s):
Balneaves, Lynda G.; Grewal, Sukhdev K.; Howard, Fuchsia A.; Bottorf, Joan L.
Author Details:
Lynda G. Balneaves, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: balneaves@nursing.ubc.ca; Sukhdev K. Grewal; Fuchsia A. Howard; Joan L. Bottorff
Abstract:
Introduction: Breast and cervical cancer are important health issues within the immigrant South Asian community in Canada. In response to the high incidence of advanced cancer in this population, a research program has been developed that focuses on the health of South Asian women who have immigrated to Canada. Our studies of South Asian women's beliefs about breast cancer and breast health practices provide important insights about women's under use of early cancer detection strategies. Our ethnographic research has also shown how South Asian women's health-seeking patterns are influenced by the way they frame their health concerns, roles within their families and communities, and their use of traditional medicines. Further, we have found evidence that South Asian women's access to health services in Canada, such as Pap testing, is complicated by factors such as gender of the health care provider and discriminatory and racialized experiences within the health care system. Purpose: This workshop will provide participants with insights gained from a Canadian research program focused on understanding the health beliefs and behaviours of immigrant South Asian women. The workshop will also encourage discussion regarding the applicability of the Canadian research findings to women living in South Asia and the challenges of conducting international women's health research. Activities: This workshop will begin with a panel presentation of the key findings and implications of four completed research studies that explored the cervical and breast health practices and beliefs of immigrant South Asian women living in Canada. A facilitated group discussion will then explore participants' clinical and research experiences related to South Asian women's breast and cervical health, as well as factors perceived to be barriers and facilitators in conducting women's health research. In addition, breakout groups will be used to encourage participants to collaborate in identifying potential intervention strategies specific to improving the cervical and breast health of South Asian women. Strategies to be considered include community screening clinics, peer-mentoring programs, and innovative health communication material. Field notes and flipcharts will be used throughout the workshop to capture key ideas and suggestions to inform future research projects and international partnerships.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Beliefs and Behaviours of Immigrant South Asian Women: A Canadian Research Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBalneaves, Lynda G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrewal, Sukhdev K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Fuchsia A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBottorf, Joan L.en_US
dc.author.detailsLynda G. Balneaves, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: balneaves@nursing.ubc.ca; Sukhdev K. Grewal; Fuchsia A. Howard; Joan L. Bottorffen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163917-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Breast and cervical cancer are important health issues within the immigrant South Asian community in Canada. In response to the high incidence of advanced cancer in this population, a research program has been developed that focuses on the health of South Asian women who have immigrated to Canada. Our studies of South Asian women's beliefs about breast cancer and breast health practices provide important insights about women's under use of early cancer detection strategies. Our ethnographic research has also shown how South Asian women's health-seeking patterns are influenced by the way they frame their health concerns, roles within their families and communities, and their use of traditional medicines. Further, we have found evidence that South Asian women's access to health services in Canada, such as Pap testing, is complicated by factors such as gender of the health care provider and discriminatory and racialized experiences within the health care system. Purpose: This workshop will provide participants with insights gained from a Canadian research program focused on understanding the health beliefs and behaviours of immigrant South Asian women. The workshop will also encourage discussion regarding the applicability of the Canadian research findings to women living in South Asia and the challenges of conducting international women's health research. Activities: This workshop will begin with a panel presentation of the key findings and implications of four completed research studies that explored the cervical and breast health practices and beliefs of immigrant South Asian women living in Canada. A facilitated group discussion will then explore participants' clinical and research experiences related to South Asian women's breast and cervical health, as well as factors perceived to be barriers and facilitators in conducting women's health research. In addition, breakout groups will be used to encourage participants to collaborate in identifying potential intervention strategies specific to improving the cervical and breast health of South Asian women. Strategies to be considered include community screening clinics, peer-mentoring programs, and innovative health communication material. Field notes and flipcharts will be used throughout the workshop to capture key ideas and suggestions to inform future research projects and international partnerships.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:52Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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