Addressing Women, Peace and Security: How Useful is the Framework of 1325?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163918
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Addressing Women, Peace and Security: How Useful is the Framework of 1325?
Author(s):
Barrow, Amy
Author Details:
Amy Barrow, Graduate Teaching Assistant/PhD Candidate, School of Law, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom, email: barrowamy@yahoo.com
Abstract:
United Nations' Security Council Resolution 1325 was unanimously passed on October 31st 2000. It is the first resolution to be passed by the Security Council that specifically considers the impact of war on women and women's key role in conflict resolution and sustainable peace. In terms of content, the provisions prove to be quite ambitious and exceptionally broad, concentrating on four thematic areas; gender based violence, access to decision-making, peacekeeping operations and disarmament, demobilization and reintegration processes. The breadth of goals contained within 1325 make both the Resolution and its aims quite complex and could prove to be problematic when the Resolution is applied and implemented in practice. Despite its complexity however, the rich content and variety of themes could be deemed to be a positive attribute of 1325, allowing for a creative and flexible approach in its application. This paper will consider the ways in which policymakers, NGOs and grassroots organizations are using 1325 in practice. The language contained within 1325, as in other UN Security Council Resolutions, is quite weak and rather loose. There seems to be little in the way of provisions that will ensure a follow-up or further enforcement of 1325. Five years on Resolution 1325 remains weakly implemented and perhaps little known outside of feminist circles. Although a recent report by the Secretary-General of the United Nations develops a system wide action plan, are the provisions too little too late? The plan is structured according to 12 areas of action identified in 1325, with a timeframe of 2005-2007 to push for the implementation of the Resolution. Within the plan, UN bodies including UNIFEM, the Department of Peacekeeping Operations and other UN agencies are assigned key strategies and actions with the aim of achieving a set output. However, will 1325 remain an instrument of grassroots organizations? Drawing on preliminary research undertaken with NGOs from both developing and developed countries this paper will consider the challenges of using 1325 in practice and whether 1325 is a useful framework for addressing the relationship between women, peace and security.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAddressing Women, Peace and Security: How Useful is the Framework of 1325?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarrow, Amyen_US
dc.author.detailsAmy Barrow, Graduate Teaching Assistant/PhD Candidate, School of Law, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom, email: barrowamy@yahoo.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163918-
dc.description.abstractUnited Nations' Security Council Resolution 1325 was unanimously passed on October 31st 2000. It is the first resolution to be passed by the Security Council that specifically considers the impact of war on women and women's key role in conflict resolution and sustainable peace. In terms of content, the provisions prove to be quite ambitious and exceptionally broad, concentrating on four thematic areas; gender based violence, access to decision-making, peacekeeping operations and disarmament, demobilization and reintegration processes. The breadth of goals contained within 1325 make both the Resolution and its aims quite complex and could prove to be problematic when the Resolution is applied and implemented in practice. Despite its complexity however, the rich content and variety of themes could be deemed to be a positive attribute of 1325, allowing for a creative and flexible approach in its application. This paper will consider the ways in which policymakers, NGOs and grassroots organizations are using 1325 in practice. The language contained within 1325, as in other UN Security Council Resolutions, is quite weak and rather loose. There seems to be little in the way of provisions that will ensure a follow-up or further enforcement of 1325. Five years on Resolution 1325 remains weakly implemented and perhaps little known outside of feminist circles. Although a recent report by the Secretary-General of the United Nations develops a system wide action plan, are the provisions too little too late? The plan is structured according to 12 areas of action identified in 1325, with a timeframe of 2005-2007 to push for the implementation of the Resolution. Within the plan, UN bodies including UNIFEM, the Department of Peacekeeping Operations and other UN agencies are assigned key strategies and actions with the aim of achieving a set output. However, will 1325 remain an instrument of grassroots organizations? Drawing on preliminary research undertaken with NGOs from both developing and developed countries this paper will consider the challenges of using 1325 in practice and whether 1325 is a useful framework for addressing the relationship between women, peace and security.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:53Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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