2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163922
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Socio-Cultural Factors Affecting Children's and Women's Health
Author(s):
Bhandari, Jhabindra
Author Details:
Jhabindra Bhandari, Programme Officer - Health Sector, JICA Nepal Office, Kathmandu, Kathmandu, Nepal, email: JhabindraBhandari.NP@jica.go.jp
Abstract:
Introduction: Nepal, as one of the least developed countries in the world, is facing several development challenges of poverty, illiteracy and public health. Most importantly, the Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR) of the country is 539 per 100,000 live births which is one of the highest in the world. Similarly, infant and child mortality rates are also significantly high. Majority of the total population are living in rural areas and heavily relying on subsistence agriculture. The rural areas of the country acutely lack health infrastructure, socio-economic and health services. In this context, many rural women and children need to be empowered by improving access to information, education and health care services in the rural communities in an integrated approach. Purpose: The purposes of this paper are to present socio-cultural factors affecting children and women's health and suggest programmatic strategies to improve their health in the rural areas. Description of Methods and Procedures: The following qualitative research methods were largely used to collect information for analysis: a) Focus Group Discussion (FGD) with mothers and school children, b) In-depth interviews with mothers, school children and key stakeholders (e.g. health workers, NGO leaders, and community groups), and c) Participatory observation. Summary of the results: There are a number of socio-cultural barriers to access and utilize maternal and child health services. These are significantly affecting communities in accessing and utilizing the maternal and child health services. The wide spread gender inequality and discrimination, age-old misconceptions about safe delivery and child-birth, traditional health-care seeking behavior, indigenous health care practices and myths regarding sexual and reproductive health, marriage, trafficking, domestic violence, sexual harassment, poor awareness on the needs and benefits of maternal and child health services in the communities, lack of trained human resources and supportive environment for utilization of maternal and child health services. Besides, economic and physical barriers are also responsible for creating barriers to use maternal and child health services in the rural communities. Conclusion: Empowerment of children and women is crucial to improve their health by overcoming the existing socio-cultural barriers to access health care services in the communities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocio-Cultural Factors Affecting Children's and Women's Healthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBhandari, Jhabindraen_US
dc.author.detailsJhabindra Bhandari, Programme Officer - Health Sector, JICA Nepal Office, Kathmandu, Kathmandu, Nepal, email: JhabindraBhandari.NP@jica.go.jpen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163922-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Nepal, as one of the least developed countries in the world, is facing several development challenges of poverty, illiteracy and public health. Most importantly, the Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR) of the country is 539 per 100,000 live births which is one of the highest in the world. Similarly, infant and child mortality rates are also significantly high. Majority of the total population are living in rural areas and heavily relying on subsistence agriculture. The rural areas of the country acutely lack health infrastructure, socio-economic and health services. In this context, many rural women and children need to be empowered by improving access to information, education and health care services in the rural communities in an integrated approach. Purpose: The purposes of this paper are to present socio-cultural factors affecting children and women's health and suggest programmatic strategies to improve their health in the rural areas. Description of Methods and Procedures: The following qualitative research methods were largely used to collect information for analysis: a) Focus Group Discussion (FGD) with mothers and school children, b) In-depth interviews with mothers, school children and key stakeholders (e.g. health workers, NGO leaders, and community groups), and c) Participatory observation. Summary of the results: There are a number of socio-cultural barriers to access and utilize maternal and child health services. These are significantly affecting communities in accessing and utilizing the maternal and child health services. The wide spread gender inequality and discrimination, age-old misconceptions about safe delivery and child-birth, traditional health-care seeking behavior, indigenous health care practices and myths regarding sexual and reproductive health, marriage, trafficking, domestic violence, sexual harassment, poor awareness on the needs and benefits of maternal and child health services in the communities, lack of trained human resources and supportive environment for utilization of maternal and child health services. Besides, economic and physical barriers are also responsible for creating barriers to use maternal and child health services in the rural communities. Conclusion: Empowerment of children and women is crucial to improve their health by overcoming the existing socio-cultural barriers to access health care services in the communities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:57Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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