Young People and How the Community Responds to Mass Media on HIV/ AIDS Intervention Issues

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163923
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Young People and How the Community Responds to Mass Media on HIV/ AIDS Intervention Issues
Author(s):
Bhandari, R. P.; Shah, B.; Kumar Bk, S.
Author Details:
R. P. Bhandari, Medical Student and Healthcare Worker, Community Health and Environment Society Nepal, Gokarna, Kathmandu, Bagmati, Nepal, email: shambhunmc@yahoo.com; B. Shah; S. Kumar Bk
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this ongoing study is to gain insight into the way HIV/AIDS is reported in the community and to understand and disseminate the right up to date information about HIV/AIDS among youth and adolescents. Background: Young people are at the centre of global HIV/AIDS epidemic. The media plays a constructive role in preventing the future spread of the HIV/AIDS epidemic if information is presented accurately without sensation and with greater frequency. This is a crucial to Nepal because the only access to HIV/AIDS information for many people is the media. Design: A representative sample of 972 adolescent students and youths (521 male and 451 female) was provided with information on HIV/AIDS (through slides, articles, web based & drama) and a follow up interview and written test about HIV/AIDS were conducted in 2002-04. After collection, the qualitative and quantitative data obtained from the questionnaire survey were edited, coded and entered into EPI info program. Results: The analyzed data showed 61% of the students do not know the correct information and hold stigmas/discrimination, 29% know about HIV/AIDS and want to help those who suffer from the disease, and 10% want to know about it. Following this experience, all of the participants were provided with correct and updated information about HIV/AIDS. Conclusion: Due to poverty, illiteracy, gender inequality and a lack of resources, awareness of HIV/AIDS is increasing among healthy people. Mass media education is the most powerful tool to prevent these diseases spreading. This exposes young people to HIV/AIDS and teaches them skills to prevent them from contracting it, such as abstinence from sex, delaying the first sexual experience, being faithful to one partner, consistently using a latex condom properly and talking freely about HIV/AIDS. Conflict resolution, critical thinking, life skills, decision making and communication improve their self confidence and ability to make informed choices, such as postponing sex until they reach a mature age. Parents, families, communities and national policy are critical in guiding and supporting young people to make safe choices about their health and well-being. Studies of the mass media have shown that consistent, positive, emotional connections with caring adults help young people feel safe and secure, allowing them to develop the resilience needed to manage the changes in their lives without social stigmas, denial or discrimination.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleYoung People and How the Community Responds to Mass Media on HIV/ AIDS Intervention Issuesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBhandari, R. P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShah, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKumar Bk, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsR. P. Bhandari, Medical Student and Healthcare Worker, Community Health and Environment Society Nepal, Gokarna, Kathmandu, Bagmati, Nepal, email: shambhunmc@yahoo.com; B. Shah; S. Kumar Bken_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163923-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this ongoing study is to gain insight into the way HIV/AIDS is reported in the community and to understand and disseminate the right up to date information about HIV/AIDS among youth and adolescents. Background: Young people are at the centre of global HIV/AIDS epidemic. The media plays a constructive role in preventing the future spread of the HIV/AIDS epidemic if information is presented accurately without sensation and with greater frequency. This is a crucial to Nepal because the only access to HIV/AIDS information for many people is the media. Design: A representative sample of 972 adolescent students and youths (521 male and 451 female) was provided with information on HIV/AIDS (through slides, articles, web based & drama) and a follow up interview and written test about HIV/AIDS were conducted in 2002-04. After collection, the qualitative and quantitative data obtained from the questionnaire survey were edited, coded and entered into EPI info program. Results: The analyzed data showed 61% of the students do not know the correct information and hold stigmas/discrimination, 29% know about HIV/AIDS and want to help those who suffer from the disease, and 10% want to know about it. Following this experience, all of the participants were provided with correct and updated information about HIV/AIDS. Conclusion: Due to poverty, illiteracy, gender inequality and a lack of resources, awareness of HIV/AIDS is increasing among healthy people. Mass media education is the most powerful tool to prevent these diseases spreading. This exposes young people to HIV/AIDS and teaches them skills to prevent them from contracting it, such as abstinence from sex, delaying the first sexual experience, being faithful to one partner, consistently using a latex condom properly and talking freely about HIV/AIDS. Conflict resolution, critical thinking, life skills, decision making and communication improve their self confidence and ability to make informed choices, such as postponing sex until they reach a mature age. Parents, families, communities and national policy are critical in guiding and supporting young people to make safe choices about their health and well-being. Studies of the mass media have shown that consistent, positive, emotional connections with caring adults help young people feel safe and secure, allowing them to develop the resilience needed to manage the changes in their lives without social stigmas, denial or discrimination.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:58Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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