Acid Violence: A Burning Impact on Women of Bangladesh - A Case Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163924
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Acid Violence: A Burning Impact on Women of Bangladesh - A Case Study
Author(s):
Bhuiyan, Firoz Alam; Lovely, Ferdushi Haque
Author Details:
Firoz Alam Bhuiyan, Lecturer at State university of Bangladesh, Mohammadpur, Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: f2physio@yahoo.com; Ferdushi Haque Lovely
Abstract:
Background: Acid throwing on others' faces and bodies to cause grievous injuries is a barbaric act of vengeance. For the last few years, it has been on the rise in both urban and rural areas of Bangladesh. The perpetrators are mostly men and adolescent boys. The victims are girls and young females. Design: The study analyzed some case studies to explore the reasons for the attacks, the application of the Acid Control Act and the result of its application, and to estimate which age groups are more vulnerable for acid attacks. Accurate statistics on the number of attacks in Bangladesh are hard to find given the isolated nature of rural communities in Bangladesh, but available evidence suggests an alarming trend: 139 cases were reported in 1999 (May-December), 226 in 2000, 343 in 2001, 484 in 2002, 410 in 2003, 322 in 2004, and 129 in 2005 (January-June). The number of unreported cases is thought to be high. A questionnaire was developed to gather all information related to the case study. Data were collected primarily through face-to-face interviews with cases, and some information was collected by reviewing medical reports of the cases; and from an annual report by the Acid Survivors Foundation (ASF), a renowned national NGO, working to tackle this problem. Significance: The consequence of acid attacks on survivors brings dramatic change in their lifestyle. Most victims have to give up their education or work. Social isolation, fear of further attacks, and insecurity damage their self-esteem and confidence. Illiteracy, poverty, threats of further retribution, and ignorance about legal support increase their misery. The study showed that young women are the main survivors. Although it occurs throughout Bangladesh there is limited data from reliable sources about the real number of attacks, the rehabilitation of survivors, and the outcomes for perpetrators. The study suggests that further research is required to fill these gaps and that consideration be given to build capacity in data management at the point of service delivery.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcid Violence: A Burning Impact on Women of Bangladesh - A Case Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBhuiyan, Firoz Alamen_US
dc.contributor.authorLovely, Ferdushi Haqueen_US
dc.author.detailsFiroz Alam Bhuiyan, Lecturer at State university of Bangladesh, Mohammadpur, Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: f2physio@yahoo.com; Ferdushi Haque Lovelyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163924-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Acid throwing on others' faces and bodies to cause grievous injuries is a barbaric act of vengeance. For the last few years, it has been on the rise in both urban and rural areas of Bangladesh. The perpetrators are mostly men and adolescent boys. The victims are girls and young females. Design: The study analyzed some case studies to explore the reasons for the attacks, the application of the Acid Control Act and the result of its application, and to estimate which age groups are more vulnerable for acid attacks. Accurate statistics on the number of attacks in Bangladesh are hard to find given the isolated nature of rural communities in Bangladesh, but available evidence suggests an alarming trend: 139 cases were reported in 1999 (May-December), 226 in 2000, 343 in 2001, 484 in 2002, 410 in 2003, 322 in 2004, and 129 in 2005 (January-June). The number of unreported cases is thought to be high. A questionnaire was developed to gather all information related to the case study. Data were collected primarily through face-to-face interviews with cases, and some information was collected by reviewing medical reports of the cases; and from an annual report by the Acid Survivors Foundation (ASF), a renowned national NGO, working to tackle this problem. Significance: The consequence of acid attacks on survivors brings dramatic change in their lifestyle. Most victims have to give up their education or work. Social isolation, fear of further attacks, and insecurity damage their self-esteem and confidence. Illiteracy, poverty, threats of further retribution, and ignorance about legal support increase their misery. The study showed that young women are the main survivors. Although it occurs throughout Bangladesh there is limited data from reliable sources about the real number of attacks, the rehabilitation of survivors, and the outcomes for perpetrators. The study suggests that further research is required to fill these gaps and that consideration be given to build capacity in data management at the point of service delivery.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:34:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:34:59Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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