When the Bough Breaks: Provider-Initiated Comprehensive Care is More Effective and Less Expensive for Sole-Support Parents on Social Assistance

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163926
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
When the Bough Breaks: Provider-Initiated Comprehensive Care is More Effective and Less Expensive for Sole-Support Parents on Social Assistance
Author(s):
Browne, Gina; Byrne, Carolyn; Roberts, Jacqueline; Gafni, Amiram; Whittaker, Susan; Watt, Susan; Haldane, Scott; Thomas, Ida; Ewart, Bonnie; Schuster, Michael; Underwood, Jane; Kingstone, Sheila Flynn; Rennick, Kathy
Author Details:
Gina Browne, Ph.D., R. N., Director and Founder, System Linked Research Unit on Health and Social Science Utilization; School of Nursing and Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: browneg@mcmaster.ca; Dr. Carolyn Byrne; Prof. Jacqueline Roberts; Dr. Amiram Gafni; Ms. Susan Whittaker; Dr. Susan Watt; Mr. Scott Haldane; Ms. Ida Thomas; Ms. Bonnie Ewart; Mr. Michael Schuster; Ms. Jane Underwood; Ms. Sheila Flynn Kingston; Ms. Kathy Rennick
Abstract:
Purpose: To assess the effects and expense of adding a mix of provider-initiated interventions to the health and social services typically used in a self-directed manner by sole-support parents and their children receiving social assistance in a national system of health and social insurance. Background: Intuitively, social assistance caseworkers have long recognized the linkage between poverty, mental health disorders, and single-parenthood and childhood problems. There is a general awareness that providing income support to sole-support families is, on its own, most often not enough to help them break out of the welfare cycle. Instead, addressing the multiple needs of the family to treat their whole circumstance is an alternative that needed to be investigated. Data Analysis and Discussion: Results from a 2-year interim analysis showed that providing families with proactive comprehensive care (health promotion, employment retraining and recreation activities for children) compared to allowing families to fend for themselves, results in 15% more exits from social assistance within 1 year and substantial savings to society in terms of social assistance payouts. It is no more expensive to provide health and social services in a comprehensive fashion, and equivalent reductions in parent mood disorder and child behaviour disorders, as well as equivalent increase in parent social adjustment and child competence levels were also observed. A sub-analysis at 2 years, of 337 Canadian children randomized to subsidized child care/recreation (compared to 304 children who financed and directed their own recreation) were engaged in more "quality" activities such as clubs and teams - the activity most associated with higher social competence and were lower users of physician, social work and child care services. The beneficial effect on improved competency for children was most noted for youth with an initial behavioural disorder. Parents of experimental children endorsed fewer nervous system, sleep, and anxiety disorders; needed less child care, counseling, and food bank services; endorsed a higher economic social adjustment; and reported receiving greater child support (alimony). Significance: These studies present clear evidence that providing comprehensive care to social assistance recipients produces tremendous short-and long- term financial gains and societal benefits.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhen the Bough Breaks: Provider-Initiated Comprehensive Care is More Effective and Less Expensive for Sole-Support Parents on Social Assistanceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, Ginaen_US
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Carolynen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Jacquelineen_US
dc.contributor.authorGafni, Amiramen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhittaker, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatt, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaldane, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Idaen_US
dc.contributor.authorEwart, Bonnieen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchuster, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorUnderwood, Janeen_US
dc.contributor.authorKingstone, Sheila Flynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorRennick, Kathyen_US
dc.author.detailsGina Browne, Ph.D., R. N., Director and Founder, System Linked Research Unit on Health and Social Science Utilization; School of Nursing and Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: browneg@mcmaster.ca; Dr. Carolyn Byrne; Prof. Jacqueline Roberts; Dr. Amiram Gafni; Ms. Susan Whittaker; Dr. Susan Watt; Mr. Scott Haldane; Ms. Ida Thomas; Ms. Bonnie Ewart; Mr. Michael Schuster; Ms. Jane Underwood; Ms. Sheila Flynn Kingston; Ms. Kathy Rennicken_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163926-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To assess the effects and expense of adding a mix of provider-initiated interventions to the health and social services typically used in a self-directed manner by sole-support parents and their children receiving social assistance in a national system of health and social insurance. Background: Intuitively, social assistance caseworkers have long recognized the linkage between poverty, mental health disorders, and single-parenthood and childhood problems. There is a general awareness that providing income support to sole-support families is, on its own, most often not enough to help them break out of the welfare cycle. Instead, addressing the multiple needs of the family to treat their whole circumstance is an alternative that needed to be investigated. Data Analysis and Discussion: Results from a 2-year interim analysis showed that providing families with proactive comprehensive care (health promotion, employment retraining and recreation activities for children) compared to allowing families to fend for themselves, results in 15% more exits from social assistance within 1 year and substantial savings to society in terms of social assistance payouts. It is no more expensive to provide health and social services in a comprehensive fashion, and equivalent reductions in parent mood disorder and child behaviour disorders, as well as equivalent increase in parent social adjustment and child competence levels were also observed. A sub-analysis at 2 years, of 337 Canadian children randomized to subsidized child care/recreation (compared to 304 children who financed and directed their own recreation) were engaged in more "quality" activities such as clubs and teams - the activity most associated with higher social competence and were lower users of physician, social work and child care services. The beneficial effect on improved competency for children was most noted for youth with an initial behavioural disorder. Parents of experimental children endorsed fewer nervous system, sleep, and anxiety disorders; needed less child care, counseling, and food bank services; endorsed a higher economic social adjustment; and reported receiving greater child support (alimony). Significance: These studies present clear evidence that providing comprehensive care to social assistance recipients produces tremendous short-and long- term financial gains and societal benefits.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:01Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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