Complementary Therapies: Nursing Students and Faculty Utilization Perspectives: Steps Toward Patient Empowerment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163927
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Complementary Therapies: Nursing Students and Faculty Utilization Perspectives: Steps Toward Patient Empowerment
Author(s):
Burrell, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Burrell, Ph.D., APRN, BC, Assistant Dean of Nursing for Students, Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Hawaii Pacific University, Kaneohe, Hawaii, USA email: pburrell@hpu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Complementary Alternative Medicine/Therapy (CAM) is a growing branch within the health care industry in the west and is considered to be a multi-billion dollar industry. Complementary therapies include massage, vitamin usage, acupuncture, acupressure, Shiatsu, spinal manipulation, visualization, herbal medicine, homeopathy, yoga, aromatherapy, hypnosis, meditation, and naturopathy to name a few. Although there is increasing knowledge about the efficacy or lack thereof of such treatments, little is known about health care professionals' use of such therapies for self-care. If practitioners use such therapies, then they are more likely to appreciate, support and empower their patients in the utilization of such therapies. The purpose of this study was to describe student and nursing faculty perspectives about CAM and their subsequent support and empowerment of their patients. This is a replication of the study by Kalischuk, Chow and Groft of Canada. Methods: Students in an undergraduate research class orchestrated which classes would be asked to participate in the survey. They gave out the survey and collected them after the respondents completed them. 81 students and faculty in the upper division nursing courses responded. The 3 sections of the survey focused on 1) the types of therapies and utilization, 2) self-care activities, and 3) demographic information. Results: The preliminary return rate of 59.56% indicated that 76.5% utilized CAM for themselves while 22.22% did not. Preliminary analysis of data from the first section indicates that the most highly utilized therapies were massage (61.73%); vitamin therapy (50.62%) and prayer (50.62%). Other preliminary analysis demonstrates that 61.73% indicate some level of satisfaction while 83.94% indicate some level of comfort in caring for patients who utilize CAM. Final analysis of the study will be completed by time of presentation. Conclusions: Preliminary results indicate that a large percent of the students and faculty surveyed utilized CAM.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComplementary Therapies: Nursing Students and Faculty Utilization Perspectives: Steps Toward Patient Empowermenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorBurrell, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Burrell, Ph.D., APRN, BC, Assistant Dean of Nursing for Students, Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Hawaii Pacific University, Kaneohe, Hawaii, USA email: pburrell@hpu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163927-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Complementary Alternative Medicine/Therapy (CAM) is a growing branch within the health care industry in the west and is considered to be a multi-billion dollar industry. Complementary therapies include massage, vitamin usage, acupuncture, acupressure, Shiatsu, spinal manipulation, visualization, herbal medicine, homeopathy, yoga, aromatherapy, hypnosis, meditation, and naturopathy to name a few. Although there is increasing knowledge about the efficacy or lack thereof of such treatments, little is known about health care professionals' use of such therapies for self-care. If practitioners use such therapies, then they are more likely to appreciate, support and empower their patients in the utilization of such therapies. The purpose of this study was to describe student and nursing faculty perspectives about CAM and their subsequent support and empowerment of their patients. This is a replication of the study by Kalischuk, Chow and Groft of Canada. Methods: Students in an undergraduate research class orchestrated which classes would be asked to participate in the survey. They gave out the survey and collected them after the respondents completed them. 81 students and faculty in the upper division nursing courses responded. The 3 sections of the survey focused on 1) the types of therapies and utilization, 2) self-care activities, and 3) demographic information. Results: The preliminary return rate of 59.56% indicated that 76.5% utilized CAM for themselves while 22.22% did not. Preliminary analysis of data from the first section indicates that the most highly utilized therapies were massage (61.73%); vitamin therapy (50.62%) and prayer (50.62%). Other preliminary analysis demonstrates that 61.73% indicate some level of satisfaction while 83.94% indicate some level of comfort in caring for patients who utilize CAM. Final analysis of the study will be completed by time of presentation. Conclusions: Preliminary results indicate that a large percent of the students and faculty surveyed utilized CAM.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:02Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.