2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163928
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Female Self-Immolation Experiences
Author(s):
Campbell, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Elizabeth Campbell, PhD, Student, University of Tennessee, Lansdale, Pennsylvania, USA, email: ecampbe3@utk.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine the motivation of Uzbek women who committed acts of self-immolation and survived. The study examined the role of the Islamic religion and culture, whether the act of self-immolation was a suicide attempt or an act of protest, and whether the use of fire had some symbolic significance. Self-immolation, or the intentional self-infliction of burns, among young Muslim women in the Middle East and Central Asia is increasingly becoming a cause of death and disability. However, little is known about this phenomenon. This was a descriptive, qualitative bounded case study based in Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The setting was the Umid Center, a rehabilitation center and shelter for victims of self-immolation and domestic abuse. The sample for this study included nine residents and former residents of the Umid Center who had survived acts of self-immolation and health care providers who have cared for women who have committed acts of self-immolation. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the assistance of a translator. These interviews were audiotaped and the English responses were transcribed. The data was analyzed both manually and using the qualitative data analysis software program QDAMiner, for thematic categories and code words. The results of the study found that all women interviewed were attempting suicide when they set themselves on fire and the use of fire had no symbolic significance, but was a convenient method. The findings of this study suggest that the religion and culture of Islam cannot be assumed to be contributing factors to female self-immolation. Domestic abuse and harsh lifestyles of the rural village culture were the main motivating factors in self-immolation among the women interviewed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFemale Self-Immolation Experiencesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Campbell, PhD, Student, University of Tennessee, Lansdale, Pennsylvania, USA, email: ecampbe3@utk.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163928-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the motivation of Uzbek women who committed acts of self-immolation and survived. The study examined the role of the Islamic religion and culture, whether the act of self-immolation was a suicide attempt or an act of protest, and whether the use of fire had some symbolic significance. Self-immolation, or the intentional self-infliction of burns, among young Muslim women in the Middle East and Central Asia is increasingly becoming a cause of death and disability. However, little is known about this phenomenon. This was a descriptive, qualitative bounded case study based in Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The setting was the Umid Center, a rehabilitation center and shelter for victims of self-immolation and domestic abuse. The sample for this study included nine residents and former residents of the Umid Center who had survived acts of self-immolation and health care providers who have cared for women who have committed acts of self-immolation. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the assistance of a translator. These interviews were audiotaped and the English responses were transcribed. The data was analyzed both manually and using the qualitative data analysis software program QDAMiner, for thematic categories and code words. The results of the study found that all women interviewed were attempting suicide when they set themselves on fire and the use of fire had no symbolic significance, but was a convenient method. The findings of this study suggest that the religion and culture of Islam cannot be assumed to be contributing factors to female self-immolation. Domestic abuse and harsh lifestyles of the rural village culture were the main motivating factors in self-immolation among the women interviewed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:03Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.