NursesÆ Knowledge and Attitudes Towards HIV/AIDS, and Self-Efficacy in Rural, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163929
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
NursesÆ Knowledge and Attitudes Towards HIV/AIDS, and Self-Efficacy in Rural, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Author(s):
Chambers, Tracey
Author Details:
Tracey Chambers, R.N., BScN, MSc, Student, School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada email: chambt@mcmaster.ca
Abstract:
This prospective, descriptive study used a pre- and post-test design to measure changes in clinic nurses' knowledge and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS, and overall self-efficacy, following a participatory training workshop. Registered and enrolled male and female black nurses in Region D, an impoverished, rural area of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa served as the target population for this study. Between January 1999 and January 2000, 149 nurses working in mobile or permanent rural health clinics within selected health districts of Region D completed a series of self-administered, baseline questionnaires which surveyed their knowledge and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS and overall level of self-efficacy, prior to implementation of the training program. From March to July of 2000, 84 nurses completed a 3-day (36-hour) workshop, facilitated by two trained local project nurses, using culturally-sensitive visual aids and training manuals on HIV/AIDS. Each training session emphasized learning through group participation and discussion of relevant case scenarios. Trained nurses' knowledge and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS and level of self-efficacy were re-tested in December 2001, using the same quantitative questionnaires. Only 41 nurses completed the questionnaires both before and after training. Nurses' total HIV/AIDS knowledge, HIV/AIDS attitude and self-efficacy scores were compared before and after training, and correlations between respondents' total self-efficacy scores and total HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes scores, before and after training, were calculated. Nurses scored highly on the baseline HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitude questionnaires. Small improvements at follow-up were not statistically significant. Significant, positive correlations were found between total HIV/AIDS knowledge and self-efficacy scores, before and after training, and between total HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitude scores, and HIV/AIDS attitude and self-efficacy scores, at follow-up. Misconceptions and concerns about caring for people living with HIV/AIDS were identified. This study reinforced the need for ongoing education and support for nurses; particularly those working in under-resourced, rural community settings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursesÆ Knowledge and Attitudes Towards HIV/AIDS, and Self-Efficacy in Rural, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChambers, Traceyen_US
dc.author.detailsTracey Chambers, R.N., BScN, MSc, Student, School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada email: chambt@mcmaster.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163929-
dc.description.abstractThis prospective, descriptive study used a pre- and post-test design to measure changes in clinic nurses' knowledge and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS, and overall self-efficacy, following a participatory training workshop. Registered and enrolled male and female black nurses in Region D, an impoverished, rural area of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa served as the target population for this study. Between January 1999 and January 2000, 149 nurses working in mobile or permanent rural health clinics within selected health districts of Region D completed a series of self-administered, baseline questionnaires which surveyed their knowledge and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS and overall level of self-efficacy, prior to implementation of the training program. From March to July of 2000, 84 nurses completed a 3-day (36-hour) workshop, facilitated by two trained local project nurses, using culturally-sensitive visual aids and training manuals on HIV/AIDS. Each training session emphasized learning through group participation and discussion of relevant case scenarios. Trained nurses' knowledge and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS and level of self-efficacy were re-tested in December 2001, using the same quantitative questionnaires. Only 41 nurses completed the questionnaires both before and after training. Nurses' total HIV/AIDS knowledge, HIV/AIDS attitude and self-efficacy scores were compared before and after training, and correlations between respondents' total self-efficacy scores and total HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes scores, before and after training, were calculated. Nurses scored highly on the baseline HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitude questionnaires. Small improvements at follow-up were not statistically significant. Significant, positive correlations were found between total HIV/AIDS knowledge and self-efficacy scores, before and after training, and between total HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitude scores, and HIV/AIDS attitude and self-efficacy scores, at follow-up. Misconceptions and concerns about caring for people living with HIV/AIDS were identified. This study reinforced the need for ongoing education and support for nurses; particularly those working in under-resourced, rural community settings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:04Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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