Factors Influencing Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) of Women Caregivers of Elderly Stroke Survivors in Thailand

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163933
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Influencing Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) of Women Caregivers of Elderly Stroke Survivors in Thailand
Author(s):
Chatcheydang, Jariya; Schmitt, Madeline; Mick, Diane; Tu, Xin
Author Details:
Jariya Chatcheydang, PhD, RN, Instructor, McCormick Faculty of Nursing, Payap University, Muang, Chiang Mai, Thailand, email: Jariya_c@payap.ac.th; Madeline Schmitt; Diane Mick; Xin Tu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this cross-sectional, descriptive-correlational study is to assess the strains and rewards of caregiving and the health related quality of life (HRQOL) of Thai female caregivers of elderly stroke survivors. This includes examining a model of relationships between these variables as well as care-receiver characteristics. Background: Stroke is the most prevalent chronic physical impairment and disability in Thailand. About 80% of stroke survivors live with family and are cared for by women family members. However, there are few studies about the caregiving strains and rewards for these caregivers, and health related quality of life (HRQOL) of these women has not previously been examined. Design: A convenience sample of 108 out-patient survivors, age 60 years and over, along with their family caregivers were recruited from a northern Thai neurological hospital. There were 4 sets of caregiver variables- demographic data; caregivers' strain, worry and rewards from direct care, measured by the Family Care Inventory; HRQOL, measured by the physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Questionnaire (SF-36) Standard Version. The care receivers' variable severity of stroke was measured by the Barthel Index (ADL) and the Chula Index (IADL). Results: Caregivers reported low strain but high rewards of caregiving. When compared to SF-36 U.S. population norms, caregivers' mean score on the PCS was similar; whereas MCS mean score was somewhat lower. Strain from direct care correlated negatively with both PCS and MCS. Strain from worry correlated negatively only with MCS while rewards of caregiving correlated positively with MCS. Older caregivers experienced more strain from direct care and a lower PCS, but were more likely to have a better MCS than younger caregivers. Caregivers' income correlated negatively to direct care strain and worry. Stroke survivors' ADL and IADL correlated negatively with direct care strain and worry. In mediation testing, caregivers of highly ADL-dependent survivors experiencing greater direct care strain had lower PCS and MCS and lower MCS related to greater strain from worry. Conclusion: Study results expanded knowledge about Thai female caregivers, and could have implications for improving their quality of life, and for the design of future research.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Influencing Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) of Women Caregivers of Elderly Stroke Survivors in Thailanden_GB
dc.contributor.authorChatcheydang, Jariyaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchmitt, Madelineen_US
dc.contributor.authorMick, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorTu, Xinen_US
dc.author.detailsJariya Chatcheydang, PhD, RN, Instructor, McCormick Faculty of Nursing, Payap University, Muang, Chiang Mai, Thailand, email: Jariya_c@payap.ac.th; Madeline Schmitt; Diane Mick; Xin Tuen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163933-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this cross-sectional, descriptive-correlational study is to assess the strains and rewards of caregiving and the health related quality of life (HRQOL) of Thai female caregivers of elderly stroke survivors. This includes examining a model of relationships between these variables as well as care-receiver characteristics. Background: Stroke is the most prevalent chronic physical impairment and disability in Thailand. About 80% of stroke survivors live with family and are cared for by women family members. However, there are few studies about the caregiving strains and rewards for these caregivers, and health related quality of life (HRQOL) of these women has not previously been examined. Design: A convenience sample of 108 out-patient survivors, age 60 years and over, along with their family caregivers were recruited from a northern Thai neurological hospital. There were 4 sets of caregiver variables- demographic data; caregivers' strain, worry and rewards from direct care, measured by the Family Care Inventory; HRQOL, measured by the physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Questionnaire (SF-36) Standard Version. The care receivers' variable severity of stroke was measured by the Barthel Index (ADL) and the Chula Index (IADL). Results: Caregivers reported low strain but high rewards of caregiving. When compared to SF-36 U.S. population norms, caregivers' mean score on the PCS was similar; whereas MCS mean score was somewhat lower. Strain from direct care correlated negatively with both PCS and MCS. Strain from worry correlated negatively only with MCS while rewards of caregiving correlated positively with MCS. Older caregivers experienced more strain from direct care and a lower PCS, but were more likely to have a better MCS than younger caregivers. Caregivers' income correlated negatively to direct care strain and worry. Stroke survivors' ADL and IADL correlated negatively with direct care strain and worry. In mediation testing, caregivers of highly ADL-dependent survivors experiencing greater direct care strain had lower PCS and MCS and lower MCS related to greater strain from worry. Conclusion: Study results expanded knowledge about Thai female caregivers, and could have implications for improving their quality of life, and for the design of future research.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:09Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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