Biological Health Issues Among Married Women of Reproductive Age Group Living in an Urban Slum of Kolkata

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163939
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Biological Health Issues Among Married Women of Reproductive Age Group Living in an Urban Slum of Kolkata
Author(s):
Dutta Sarkar, Reshmi; Deb, Soumya; Dasgupta, Aparajita
Author Details:
Reshmi Dutta Sarkar, MBBS, DPH - 1st yr PGT, Student, Kolkata Sagnik Welfare Society, All India Institute of Hygiene and Public Health, Kolkata, West Bengal, India, email: reshmiduttasarkar1@yahoo.co.in; Dr. Soumya Deb; Dr. Aparajita Dasgupta
Abstract:
Introduction: In-depth interviews were conducted with married women of reproductive age (15-45 yrs) by home visit. Interviews revealed the alarming status of the biological health of women living in a slum near Jadavpur railway station, Kolkata, a neglected pocket surrounded by high-rise buildings. The questionnaire included questions on literacy, socioeconomic status, health problems with emphasis on gynaecological problems, reproductive tract infections, health care seeking behavior and social problems like domestic violence, alcoholism and visits to prostitutes among husbands. Lastly, some aspects of child rearing, contraceptive practices as well as health knowledge of common diseases were elicited. Objectives: To examine the socioeconomic and socio-demographic status of the study population, and to examine the association between socioeconomic status and biological health issues. Methodology: This was a community-based, observational, cross sectional study. A sample of 120 married women of reproductive age, residing in an urban slum was interviewed using a pre-designed, pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire. Results: In the study sample, 50% were married between 15 and 16 years of age; 63.3 % could not read or write; and 45% earned their livelihood as maid-servants. 55% of the women complained of menstrual problems, while 91.7% used or reused a piece of cloth during menstruation instead of sanitary pads. The presence of reproductive tract infections was evident: 71.7% complained of white vaginal discharge, 11.67% reported a foul smelling discharge, 46.7% reported a history of associated pruritus and 15% reported symptoms of urinary tract infection. 63.3% were using family planning methods (OCP-23.33%, Ligation-21.66%, IUCD-15%, condoms-5%, others-1.66%). 10% of the women revealed that their husbands visit brothels. 81.7% said that their husbands were alcoholics while 58% were abused by husbands or in-laws. 58.3% of the women gave birth to 3 or more children; the highest being 7. 48.3% practiced exclusive breast feeding up to 6 months. Only 5% knew of AIDS/STDs and their spread. Conclusion: The living conditions and quality of life of women in urban slums of Kolkata are very poor, as reflected in the above study. To overcome these problems, improvements in adult literacy, health education and health care service utilization are needed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBiological Health Issues Among Married Women of Reproductive Age Group Living in an Urban Slum of Kolkataen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDutta Sarkar, Reshmien_US
dc.contributor.authorDeb, Soumyaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDasgupta, Aparajitaen_US
dc.author.detailsReshmi Dutta Sarkar, MBBS, DPH - 1st yr PGT, Student, Kolkata Sagnik Welfare Society, All India Institute of Hygiene and Public Health, Kolkata, West Bengal, India, email: reshmiduttasarkar1@yahoo.co.in; Dr. Soumya Deb; Dr. Aparajita Dasguptaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163939-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: In-depth interviews were conducted with married women of reproductive age (15-45 yrs) by home visit. Interviews revealed the alarming status of the biological health of women living in a slum near Jadavpur railway station, Kolkata, a neglected pocket surrounded by high-rise buildings. The questionnaire included questions on literacy, socioeconomic status, health problems with emphasis on gynaecological problems, reproductive tract infections, health care seeking behavior and social problems like domestic violence, alcoholism and visits to prostitutes among husbands. Lastly, some aspects of child rearing, contraceptive practices as well as health knowledge of common diseases were elicited. Objectives: To examine the socioeconomic and socio-demographic status of the study population, and to examine the association between socioeconomic status and biological health issues. Methodology: This was a community-based, observational, cross sectional study. A sample of 120 married women of reproductive age, residing in an urban slum was interviewed using a pre-designed, pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire. Results: In the study sample, 50% were married between 15 and 16 years of age; 63.3 % could not read or write; and 45% earned their livelihood as maid-servants. 55% of the women complained of menstrual problems, while 91.7% used or reused a piece of cloth during menstruation instead of sanitary pads. The presence of reproductive tract infections was evident: 71.7% complained of white vaginal discharge, 11.67% reported a foul smelling discharge, 46.7% reported a history of associated pruritus and 15% reported symptoms of urinary tract infection. 63.3% were using family planning methods (OCP-23.33%, Ligation-21.66%, IUCD-15%, condoms-5%, others-1.66%). 10% of the women revealed that their husbands visit brothels. 81.7% said that their husbands were alcoholics while 58% were abused by husbands or in-laws. 58.3% of the women gave birth to 3 or more children; the highest being 7. 48.3% practiced exclusive breast feeding up to 6 months. Only 5% knew of AIDS/STDs and their spread. Conclusion: The living conditions and quality of life of women in urban slums of Kolkata are very poor, as reflected in the above study. To overcome these problems, improvements in adult literacy, health education and health care service utilization are needed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:15Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.