Challenges in a "Train the Trainer" Maternity Project in Postwar Kosovo

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163940
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Challenges in a "Train the Trainer" Maternity Project in Postwar Kosovo
Author(s):
Ellis, Cathryn
Author Details:
Cathryn Ellis, RM, MSc, Midwifery Instructor, Midwifery Division, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: cathy.ellis@midwifery.ubc.ca
Abstract:
Purpose: To examine the challenges I experienced while implementing the Maternity Training in Kosovo project (February 2001 to March 2004), a program that was launched in response to the high incidence of perinatal mortality in the region. The main goal was to participate in stabilizing a healthcare system fragmented by prolonged conflict in Kosovo (part of the former Yugoslavia). Background: All phases of the project were funded by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and implemented through the Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA) and the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA). In particular, the project sought to decrease maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality by providing local nurses and midwives with up to date training in maternity care. Midwives have always played a vital part of birthing in Kosovo, but had not received upgrading for more than a decade due to the conflict in their country. As a result unsafe, outdated practices contributed to poor health outcomes for mothers and their infants. Design: In order to reduce perinatal mortality in Kosovo, the Canadian midwife and nurse team implemented two "Train the Trainer" courses. A combination of theoretical knowledge and practical skills on the wards contributed to learning. Instructors introduced updates on communications skills, prenatal care, adequate monitoring during labour and safe and humane delivery practices, postnatal care and family planning. An independent evaluation followed the first course. The course was improved and lengthened and a second one was offered using Kosovar midwives as co-instructors. Instructors conducted follow-ups in all clinics and hospitals where participants worked in order to reinforce and model safe midwifery practices. Results: The instructors faced challenges in introducing new skills to midwives when upgrading had not yet been offered to physicians, and physical challenges such as the scarcity of heat and water in hospitals. Conclusions: Successes of the program include the benefits of involving local trainers, side-by-side training on the wards, and the continuity of the project over several years. Birthing practices became more humane and some out of date practices were discontinued.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChallenges in a "Train the Trainer" Maternity Project in Postwar Kosovoen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Cathrynen_US
dc.author.detailsCathryn Ellis, RM, MSc, Midwifery Instructor, Midwifery Division, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: cathy.ellis@midwifery.ubc.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163940-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To examine the challenges I experienced while implementing the Maternity Training in Kosovo project (February 2001 to March 2004), a program that was launched in response to the high incidence of perinatal mortality in the region. The main goal was to participate in stabilizing a healthcare system fragmented by prolonged conflict in Kosovo (part of the former Yugoslavia). Background: All phases of the project were funded by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and implemented through the Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA) and the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA). In particular, the project sought to decrease maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality by providing local nurses and midwives with up to date training in maternity care. Midwives have always played a vital part of birthing in Kosovo, but had not received upgrading for more than a decade due to the conflict in their country. As a result unsafe, outdated practices contributed to poor health outcomes for mothers and their infants. Design: In order to reduce perinatal mortality in Kosovo, the Canadian midwife and nurse team implemented two "Train the Trainer" courses. A combination of theoretical knowledge and practical skills on the wards contributed to learning. Instructors introduced updates on communications skills, prenatal care, adequate monitoring during labour and safe and humane delivery practices, postnatal care and family planning. An independent evaluation followed the first course. The course was improved and lengthened and a second one was offered using Kosovar midwives as co-instructors. Instructors conducted follow-ups in all clinics and hospitals where participants worked in order to reinforce and model safe midwifery practices. Results: The instructors faced challenges in introducing new skills to midwives when upgrading had not yet been offered to physicians, and physical challenges such as the scarcity of heat and water in hospitals. Conclusions: Successes of the program include the benefits of involving local trainers, side-by-side training on the wards, and the continuity of the project over several years. Birthing practices became more humane and some out of date practices were discontinued.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:16Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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