2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163941
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Worklife Experiences of African Canadian Nurses
Author(s):
Etowa, Josephine Bassey; Thompson, Roxie; Sethi, Sarla
Author Details:
Josephine Etowa, PhD, MN, BSc.N, RN, RM, IBCLC, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, email: Josephine.Etowa@dal.ca; Roxie Thompson; Sarla Sethi
Abstract:
Purpose: To discuss the findings of a research study that used grounded theory method to explicate the worklife experiences of African Canadian nurses within the health care system of Nova Scotia. The aim of this research was to develop substantive theory of this phenomenon. Background: As the largest workforce in the health care system, nurses are striving to meet the changing health care needs of a culturally diverse Canadian population. Although the face of Canadian nursing has changed over the years, nursing continues to experience under-representation of minorities. Design: Data were collected using informal interviews, observations, field notes and group meetings. Twenty Black nurses participated in this study. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method, and Atlas ti qualitative data management computer software facilitated the analysis process. Results: A substantive theory, "surviving on the margin of a profession," emerged. This theory explains the way in which Black nurses maintain their existence in nursing despite being on the margin of the profession. The three phases of the theory are: "realizing," "surviving," and "thriving." The three major categories that support the theory are "racism," "diversity," and the "quality of professional experiences." Conclusion: the paper will conclude with implications of these findings for both nursing and the African Canadian community, including the need for a more diverse nursing workforce, and mentoring initiatives both within and outside the Black community. It will also highlight the potential contributions of this study within the growing body of knowledge on African Canadians; in research involving race relations in nursing; and in the theoretical literature of being on the margin.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Worklife Experiences of African Canadian Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEtowa, Josephine Basseyen_US
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Roxieen_US
dc.contributor.authorSethi, Sarlaen_US
dc.author.detailsJosephine Etowa, PhD, MN, BSc.N, RN, RM, IBCLC, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, email: Josephine.Etowa@dal.ca; Roxie Thompson; Sarla Sethien_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163941-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To discuss the findings of a research study that used grounded theory method to explicate the worklife experiences of African Canadian nurses within the health care system of Nova Scotia. The aim of this research was to develop substantive theory of this phenomenon. Background: As the largest workforce in the health care system, nurses are striving to meet the changing health care needs of a culturally diverse Canadian population. Although the face of Canadian nursing has changed over the years, nursing continues to experience under-representation of minorities. Design: Data were collected using informal interviews, observations, field notes and group meetings. Twenty Black nurses participated in this study. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method, and Atlas ti qualitative data management computer software facilitated the analysis process. Results: A substantive theory, "surviving on the margin of a profession," emerged. This theory explains the way in which Black nurses maintain their existence in nursing despite being on the margin of the profession. The three phases of the theory are: "realizing," "surviving," and "thriving." The three major categories that support the theory are "racism," "diversity," and the "quality of professional experiences." Conclusion: the paper will conclude with implications of these findings for both nursing and the African Canadian community, including the need for a more diverse nursing workforce, and mentoring initiatives both within and outside the Black community. It will also highlight the potential contributions of this study within the growing body of knowledge on African Canadians; in research involving race relations in nursing; and in the theoretical literature of being on the margin.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:17Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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