A Qualitative Study and a Project Plan to Improve Maternal Health of Refugees in Eastern Sudan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163944
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Qualitative Study and a Project Plan to Improve Maternal Health of Refugees in Eastern Sudan
Author(s):
Furuta, Marie; Mori, Rintaro
Author Details:
Marie Furuta, Lecturer, Department of Community Health Nursing, St. Mary's College, Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan, email: furuta@st-mary.ac.jp; Rintaro Mori
Abstract:
Introduction: Regional instability has contributed to the flow of refugees to and within Sudan since the 1960's. Prolonged forced migration has significantly lowered the quality of life for refugees, particularly women due to various aspects of inadequate resources in safe motherhood, resulting in a higher maternal mortality ratio than the national average. An effective healthcare programme to improve their health status is needed for the sake of both human rights and public health concerns. Objective: To develop effective strategies to improve maternal health among these refugees. Method: A focus group discussion and in-depth interviews were conducted with health workers and women of reproductive age in refugee camps in Eastern Sudan in December 2003. The PRECEDE-PROCEED model was used as an analytical tool, and a logical framework was developed. A project plan reflecting the findings was also developed. Results: The discussion and interviews showed that the following factors seemed to play critical roles to promote maternal health in the refugee camps: (1) Supportive environments for safe motherhood; (2) Capacity of health staff to provide effective health education for all; (3) Capacity of health centres to deliver effective outreach services for women before, during and after childbirth; (4) Local capacity for sustainability and accessibility of basic obstetric care and for effective referral for obstetric/medical emergencies. Based on these findings, a community-based project plan (SHARES: Safe motherhood Health promotion Action plan for refugees in Eastern Sudan) was developed. The project facilitates a 'process of enabling people to increase control over and to improve their health' (WHO 1986). All community members participate in the whole process of the project cycle, enhancing community ownership and decentralization of responsibilities to ensure self-reliance in the long term. Conclusion: Capacity building in health education and regional services ensures involvement of local people/staffs was considered critical to improve maternal health in the above healthcare setting. A plan of a community-based project reflecting this and implication to other healthcare settings/regions will also be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Qualitative Study and a Project Plan to Improve Maternal Health of Refugees in Eastern Sudanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFuruta, Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorMori, Rintaroen_US
dc.author.detailsMarie Furuta, Lecturer, Department of Community Health Nursing, St. Mary's College, Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan, email: furuta@st-mary.ac.jp; Rintaro Morien_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163944-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Regional instability has contributed to the flow of refugees to and within Sudan since the 1960's. Prolonged forced migration has significantly lowered the quality of life for refugees, particularly women due to various aspects of inadequate resources in safe motherhood, resulting in a higher maternal mortality ratio than the national average. An effective healthcare programme to improve their health status is needed for the sake of both human rights and public health concerns. Objective: To develop effective strategies to improve maternal health among these refugees. Method: A focus group discussion and in-depth interviews were conducted with health workers and women of reproductive age in refugee camps in Eastern Sudan in December 2003. The PRECEDE-PROCEED model was used as an analytical tool, and a logical framework was developed. A project plan reflecting the findings was also developed. Results: The discussion and interviews showed that the following factors seemed to play critical roles to promote maternal health in the refugee camps: (1) Supportive environments for safe motherhood; (2) Capacity of health staff to provide effective health education for all; (3) Capacity of health centres to deliver effective outreach services for women before, during and after childbirth; (4) Local capacity for sustainability and accessibility of basic obstetric care and for effective referral for obstetric/medical emergencies. Based on these findings, a community-based project plan (SHARES: Safe motherhood Health promotion Action plan for refugees in Eastern Sudan) was developed. The project facilitates a 'process of enabling people to increase control over and to improve their health' (WHO 1986). All community members participate in the whole process of the project cycle, enhancing community ownership and decentralization of responsibilities to ensure self-reliance in the long term. Conclusion: Capacity building in health education and regional services ensures involvement of local people/staffs was considered critical to improve maternal health in the above healthcare setting. A plan of a community-based project reflecting this and implication to other healthcare settings/regions will also be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:21Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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