HIV Prevalence and Risk Behaviour of Female Sex Workers in Bangladesh: Findings from National Surveillance

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163946
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HIV Prevalence and Risk Behaviour of Female Sex Workers in Bangladesh: Findings from National Surveillance
Author(s):
Gazi, Rukhsana
Author Details:
Rukhsana Gazi, Associate Scientist & Acting Head, Health System Economics Unit, Health Systems and Infectious Diseases Division (HSID), International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research: Centre for Health and Population Research (ICDDR, B), Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: rukhsana@icddrb.org
Abstract:
The present analysis is a part of fifth round Serological and Behavioural surveillance conducted by ICDDR, B: Centre for Health and Population Research with technical assistance of the Government of Bangladesh and the Family Health International (FHI). The surveillance covered all brothels in Bangladesh and selected sites for street and hotel sex workers. In behavioural surveillance all groups except brothels were sampled using a two-stage probability sampling methodology; time location sampling as a first stage and a "fixed" or "take all" approach as a second stage. For serological surveillance each blood sample was split into two: one unlinked sample was screened for HIV, and the other linked sample was screened for syphilis and treatment given if necessary. Although the prevalence of HIV was very low among sex workers, active syphilis rates were very high. Mean age of sex workers ranges from 18 to 25 years while median age of first sex was around 14 years. Many were married or had regular partners. Hotel sex workers were newer in the profession compared to others and tended to have higher numbers of clients in the past week. All groups reported anal sex with both new and regular clients. Many reported knowing clients or non-commercial partners who injected drugs. Clients of the sex workers were from diverse groups. Overall, consistent condom use was low irrespective of types of sexual partners. Self-risk perception was very low. Genital ulcer/sores were recognized by most sex workers and reported by some in the last year. Violence was commonly reported. Many who were involved with interventions in the last year perceived it helped in changing their behaviors. Given the high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (SDT), there are potentials for further spread of HIV. HIV prevention intervention should target not only the sex workers but also the general male population providing clear information on mode of transmission of HIV and safe sex practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHIV Prevalence and Risk Behaviour of Female Sex Workers in Bangladesh: Findings from National Surveillanceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGazi, Rukhsanaen_US
dc.author.detailsRukhsana Gazi, Associate Scientist & Acting Head, Health System Economics Unit, Health Systems and Infectious Diseases Division (HSID), International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research: Centre for Health and Population Research (ICDDR, B), Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: rukhsana@icddrb.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163946-
dc.description.abstractThe present analysis is a part of fifth round Serological and Behavioural surveillance conducted by ICDDR, B: Centre for Health and Population Research with technical assistance of the Government of Bangladesh and the Family Health International (FHI). The surveillance covered all brothels in Bangladesh and selected sites for street and hotel sex workers. In behavioural surveillance all groups except brothels were sampled using a two-stage probability sampling methodology; time location sampling as a first stage and a "fixed" or "take all" approach as a second stage. For serological surveillance each blood sample was split into two: one unlinked sample was screened for HIV, and the other linked sample was screened for syphilis and treatment given if necessary. Although the prevalence of HIV was very low among sex workers, active syphilis rates were very high. Mean age of sex workers ranges from 18 to 25 years while median age of first sex was around 14 years. Many were married or had regular partners. Hotel sex workers were newer in the profession compared to others and tended to have higher numbers of clients in the past week. All groups reported anal sex with both new and regular clients. Many reported knowing clients or non-commercial partners who injected drugs. Clients of the sex workers were from diverse groups. Overall, consistent condom use was low irrespective of types of sexual partners. Self-risk perception was very low. Genital ulcer/sores were recognized by most sex workers and reported by some in the last year. Violence was commonly reported. Many who were involved with interventions in the last year perceived it helped in changing their behaviors. Given the high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (SDT), there are potentials for further spread of HIV. HIV prevention intervention should target not only the sex workers but also the general male population providing clear information on mode of transmission of HIV and safe sex practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:23Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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