Gulti (Lumps), Bumps and Darde (Pain): Punjabi Women's Subjective Experience of Breast Cancer Symptoms

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163949
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gulti (Lumps), Bumps and Darde (Pain): Punjabi Women's Subjective Experience of Breast Cancer Symptoms
Author(s):
Grewal, Sukhdev K.; Bottorff, Joan L.; Balneaves, Lynda G.; Naidu, Mita; Johnson, Joy L.
Author Details:
Sukhdev K. Grewal, Langara College, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: sukigrewal@shaw.ca; Joan L. Bottorff; Lynda G. Balneaves; Mita Naidu; Joy L. Johnson
Abstract:
Introduction: Although early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer is important in reducing morbidity and mortality, the incidence of advanced disease remains high among underserved women. Investigation of the complexities associated with women's presentation of breast symptoms has primarily focused on mainstream women. Purpose: To examine experiences related to self-discovered breast symptoms from the perspective of Punjabi immigrant women residing in Canada. Methods: Interviews were conducted with 25 women, 19 of who had received a diagnosis of breast cancer. Using narrative analysis four types of stories were identified that reflected different ways women interpreted their breast symptoms and explained their subsequent responses. Summary of Results: Four storylines were represented in women's narratives of their breast cancer symptom experiences. In stories characterized by worry, breast symptoms were immediately associated with cancer. Vivid descriptions of fears of breast cancer were juxtaposed with explanations about how women protected family members by down playing their symptoms despite inwardly feeling very worried. In the stories that were based on constructions of breast symptoms as nothing serious, women emphasized that they had not even considered the possibility of breast cancer. These women were encouraged to dismiss concerns and to worry about their health. Stories focusing on women becoming suspicious about the presence of a health problem included descriptions mounting concern and tension as the women began to realize the breast symptoms they experienced might not be of the regular or normal variety. Strength stories related to breast symptom experiences focused on gaining strength and fortification in readiness to deal with whatever may lie ahead. Women drew strength from the support of their extended families, their religious belief that God would protect them, and their need to be there to care for their families. Conclusion: These findings provide a basis for guiding the development of culturally appropriate health education for Punjabi women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGulti (Lumps), Bumps and Darde (Pain): Punjabi Women's Subjective Experience of Breast Cancer Symptomsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrewal, Sukhdev K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBottorff, Joan L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBalneaves, Lynda G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNaidu, Mitaen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Joy L.en_US
dc.author.detailsSukhdev K. Grewal, Langara College, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: sukigrewal@shaw.ca; Joan L. Bottorff; Lynda G. Balneaves; Mita Naidu; Joy L. Johnsonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163949-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Although early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer is important in reducing morbidity and mortality, the incidence of advanced disease remains high among underserved women. Investigation of the complexities associated with women's presentation of breast symptoms has primarily focused on mainstream women. Purpose: To examine experiences related to self-discovered breast symptoms from the perspective of Punjabi immigrant women residing in Canada. Methods: Interviews were conducted with 25 women, 19 of who had received a diagnosis of breast cancer. Using narrative analysis four types of stories were identified that reflected different ways women interpreted their breast symptoms and explained their subsequent responses. Summary of Results: Four storylines were represented in women's narratives of their breast cancer symptom experiences. In stories characterized by worry, breast symptoms were immediately associated with cancer. Vivid descriptions of fears of breast cancer were juxtaposed with explanations about how women protected family members by down playing their symptoms despite inwardly feeling very worried. In the stories that were based on constructions of breast symptoms as nothing serious, women emphasized that they had not even considered the possibility of breast cancer. These women were encouraged to dismiss concerns and to worry about their health. Stories focusing on women becoming suspicious about the presence of a health problem included descriptions mounting concern and tension as the women began to realize the breast symptoms they experienced might not be of the regular or normal variety. Strength stories related to breast symptom experiences focused on gaining strength and fortification in readiness to deal with whatever may lie ahead. Women drew strength from the support of their extended families, their religious belief that God would protect them, and their need to be there to care for their families. Conclusion: These findings provide a basis for guiding the development of culturally appropriate health education for Punjabi women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:26Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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