HIV/AIDS, Human Rights and Social Vulnerability: Integrating Prevention into BRACÆs Poverty Eradication Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163952
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HIV/AIDS, Human Rights and Social Vulnerability: Integrating Prevention into BRACÆs Poverty Eradication Program
Author(s):
Hashima, Nasreen
Author Details:
Nasreen Hashima, Research Fellow, BRAC, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: nasreen.h@bracresearch.org
Abstract:
Despite low prevalence, the HIV epidemic in Bangladesh is evolving rapidly among a small pocket of intravenous drug users. HIV prevalence has risen from 1.4% to 8.9% during the last three years. All forms of risky behavior exist in the country, making it more vulnerable; especially the marginalized population. This research explores prevention of HIV epidemics through reducing gender inequalities and social vulnerabilities and increasing women's participation and access to decision-making about sexual and reproductive health rights issues. BRAC initiated HIV prevention activities through operations research in the late 1990s. In 1996-1997 a number of studies on HIV/AIDS awareness were conducted and from 1997-1999 behavioral studies on sex, sexuality, gender and rights were carried out. BRAC piloted the above models and condom promotion strategies from 1999-2001 in two other districts. Finally, BRAC scaled-up the piloted HIV prevention model in 4 districts targeting those at high-risk, bridging and general population. An evaluation was done to see the effect of the intervention in mid-2005. The first pilot intervention showed that unless a holistic approach of sexual and reproductive health was taken, the impact of an awareness campaign remains low. Behavior change communication strategy showed successes in changing participants' knowledge, attitude and behavior. As a result of interventions, knowledge on HIV/AIDS increased from 6% in 1996, to 60% in 2005 among the general population. Condom compliance was increased by 93% among sex workers, and 22%-26% among bus and truck drivers. Compared to baseline findings, treatment seeking behavior of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) patients was also modified from traditional to modern methods. The program participants preferred to seek treatment from medical doctors. This whole experience provides planners information about designing, implementing and scaling up of programs, with goals and targets being met. The public health policy-makers must consider a holistic approach to HIV/AIDS, laying greater emphasis on STI control and prevention together with human rights, gender, communication, family interaction and socio-economic status that would determine the nature and extent of peoples' risks and vulnerabilities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHIV/AIDS, Human Rights and Social Vulnerability: Integrating Prevention into BRACÆs Poverty Eradication Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHashima, Nasreenen_US
dc.author.detailsNasreen Hashima, Research Fellow, BRAC, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: nasreen.h@bracresearch.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163952-
dc.description.abstractDespite low prevalence, the HIV epidemic in Bangladesh is evolving rapidly among a small pocket of intravenous drug users. HIV prevalence has risen from 1.4% to 8.9% during the last three years. All forms of risky behavior exist in the country, making it more vulnerable; especially the marginalized population. This research explores prevention of HIV epidemics through reducing gender inequalities and social vulnerabilities and increasing women's participation and access to decision-making about sexual and reproductive health rights issues. BRAC initiated HIV prevention activities through operations research in the late 1990s. In 1996-1997 a number of studies on HIV/AIDS awareness were conducted and from 1997-1999 behavioral studies on sex, sexuality, gender and rights were carried out. BRAC piloted the above models and condom promotion strategies from 1999-2001 in two other districts. Finally, BRAC scaled-up the piloted HIV prevention model in 4 districts targeting those at high-risk, bridging and general population. An evaluation was done to see the effect of the intervention in mid-2005. The first pilot intervention showed that unless a holistic approach of sexual and reproductive health was taken, the impact of an awareness campaign remains low. Behavior change communication strategy showed successes in changing participants' knowledge, attitude and behavior. As a result of interventions, knowledge on HIV/AIDS increased from 6% in 1996, to 60% in 2005 among the general population. Condom compliance was increased by 93% among sex workers, and 22%-26% among bus and truck drivers. Compared to baseline findings, treatment seeking behavior of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) patients was also modified from traditional to modern methods. The program participants preferred to seek treatment from medical doctors. This whole experience provides planners information about designing, implementing and scaling up of programs, with goals and targets being met. The public health policy-makers must consider a holistic approach to HIV/AIDS, laying greater emphasis on STI control and prevention together with human rights, gender, communication, family interaction and socio-economic status that would determine the nature and extent of peoples' risks and vulnerabilities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:30Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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