2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163953
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reproductive Health, Disasters and Displacement: Never the Priority
Author(s):
Heal, Bryan Arthur Amichand
Author Details:
Bryan Arthur Amichand Heal, Research and Technical Associate, International Centre for Migration and Health, World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva, Switzerland, email: bheal@icmh.ch
Abstract:
Introduction: Responses to the Indian Ocean Tsunami and Himalayan earthquake have highlighted limitations of humanitarian relief operations and difficulties in providing care to many displaced, mobile populations. Reproductive health is consistently given low priority in disaster responses, particularly in the context of pregnancy, gynaecological care, family planning, STIs including HIV/AIDS and access to care and services. Though the response to the Himalayan earthquake is still in its emergency phase, post-Tsunami operations have transited into recovery and rehabilitation efforts and it is now possible to begin evaluating what extent the disaster and associated relief efforts have impacted on some of these areas. Purpose: (i) To discuss pregnant women and others of reproductive age in the aftermath of Tsunami. (ii) To request that governments and international agencies increase the priority of reproductive health care and family planning services in future disaster relief efforts. Results: An estimated 40,000 of the 150,000 pregnant women in the Tsunami affected region survived the disaster, and have since been living in displaced persons camps, makeshift shelters or with host families and relatives. By fall 2005 all pregnancies would have had an outcome, both for the mother and for the infant. Though public information on many of these outcomes remain scarce, important questions can be raised considering the tremendous psychosocial and physical burdens on mothers resulting from forced displacement, as well as from the losses of reproductive health workers and health risks associated with living in overcrowded conditions with poor sanitation infrastructure and low privacy. For non-pregnant women of reproductive age, persistent overcrowded conditions following Tsunami have elevated tensions among displaced populations, uplifting the risk of gender violence and uncharacteristic sexual practices. Conclusion: Sufficient protection services, family planning and contraceptive provision, while all late in arrival, should be viewed as priority services regardless if they are requested.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReproductive Health, Disasters and Displacement: Never the Priorityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHeal, Bryan Arthur Amichanden_US
dc.author.detailsBryan Arthur Amichand Heal, Research and Technical Associate, International Centre for Migration and Health, World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva, Switzerland, email: bheal@icmh.chen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163953-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Responses to the Indian Ocean Tsunami and Himalayan earthquake have highlighted limitations of humanitarian relief operations and difficulties in providing care to many displaced, mobile populations. Reproductive health is consistently given low priority in disaster responses, particularly in the context of pregnancy, gynaecological care, family planning, STIs including HIV/AIDS and access to care and services. Though the response to the Himalayan earthquake is still in its emergency phase, post-Tsunami operations have transited into recovery and rehabilitation efforts and it is now possible to begin evaluating what extent the disaster and associated relief efforts have impacted on some of these areas. Purpose: (i) To discuss pregnant women and others of reproductive age in the aftermath of Tsunami. (ii) To request that governments and international agencies increase the priority of reproductive health care and family planning services in future disaster relief efforts. Results: An estimated 40,000 of the 150,000 pregnant women in the Tsunami affected region survived the disaster, and have since been living in displaced persons camps, makeshift shelters or with host families and relatives. By fall 2005 all pregnancies would have had an outcome, both for the mother and for the infant. Though public information on many of these outcomes remain scarce, important questions can be raised considering the tremendous psychosocial and physical burdens on mothers resulting from forced displacement, as well as from the losses of reproductive health workers and health risks associated with living in overcrowded conditions with poor sanitation infrastructure and low privacy. For non-pregnant women of reproductive age, persistent overcrowded conditions following Tsunami have elevated tensions among displaced populations, uplifting the risk of gender violence and uncharacteristic sexual practices. Conclusion: Sufficient protection services, family planning and contraceptive provision, while all late in arrival, should be viewed as priority services regardless if they are requested.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:31Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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