The Effect of Puberty and Fertility Health Education on Health Knowledge and Practice in Third Class Girls in Kohgilouye and Boyerahmad Province High Schools

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163956
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Puberty and Fertility Health Education on Health Knowledge and Practice in Third Class Girls in Kohgilouye and Boyerahmad Province High Schools
Author(s):
Hosseini, Nazafarin; Jokar, A.; Karimi, Z.; Zoladl, M.; Rezaie, N.
Author Details:
Nazafarin Hosseini, Instructor, Nursing and Midwifery College, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Kohgilouye & Boyerahmad, Iran, email: hosseinichenar@yahoo.com; A. Jokar; Z. Karimi; M. Zoladl; N. Rezaie
Abstract:
Purpose: To determine the effect of puberty and fertility health education on healthy knowledge and practice. Background: Puberty is the first time to accept motherhood roles and is the period of major physical-psycho-social growth. Not having any prior knowledge of such sudden changes or of reproductive health issues and wrong information about this period could lead to a number of gynecological diseases, as well as infertility, psychological crisis, behavioral disorders even death. Design: At first, all the science teachers of the female high school students were educated about puberty and fertility. They were then assigned to 10% of the girl students of high schools (728 students) who were selected randomly for 12 sessions. All students completed health knowledge and practice questionnaires before and after education. At last, data was collected and analyzed by SPSS software. Results: In this research, findings showed that before education 50/4% of scores were weak, compared to only 6/5% of scores after education (here, weak refers to less than 10). Furthermore, before education 43.1% of scores were fair (10-14), as opposed to 60/4% after education. High scores (more than 15) were 6/55% before education which reached to 17% after education. The findings showed a significant difference between the knowledge scores before and after education (P<0.0001). With respect to taking baths during menstruation, results were different before and after education, with 62/7% of students not taking baths before education and 25/3% bathing after education. The rate of genital washing during menstruation was different in before and after education (71/7% vs. 50/1%). Conclusion: Education has had a positive effect on the knowledge and practices of students, but high percentages of students were found to be weak in health activities. It is important to better knowledge in this area, and this study's findings show that other factors such as culture and other's recommendations (specially by mothers) can be influential in sexual health practices. Education programs should therefore be widespread in girls' schools and in society/families (mothers) in general.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Puberty and Fertility Health Education on Health Knowledge and Practice in Third Class Girls in Kohgilouye and Boyerahmad Province High Schoolsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHosseini, Nazafarinen_US
dc.contributor.authorJokar, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKarimi, Z.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZoladl, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRezaie, N.en_US
dc.author.detailsNazafarin Hosseini, Instructor, Nursing and Midwifery College, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Kohgilouye & Boyerahmad, Iran, email: hosseinichenar@yahoo.com; A. Jokar; Z. Karimi; M. Zoladl; N. Rezaieen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163956-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To determine the effect of puberty and fertility health education on healthy knowledge and practice. Background: Puberty is the first time to accept motherhood roles and is the period of major physical-psycho-social growth. Not having any prior knowledge of such sudden changes or of reproductive health issues and wrong information about this period could lead to a number of gynecological diseases, as well as infertility, psychological crisis, behavioral disorders even death. Design: At first, all the science teachers of the female high school students were educated about puberty and fertility. They were then assigned to 10% of the girl students of high schools (728 students) who were selected randomly for 12 sessions. All students completed health knowledge and practice questionnaires before and after education. At last, data was collected and analyzed by SPSS software. Results: In this research, findings showed that before education 50/4% of scores were weak, compared to only 6/5% of scores after education (here, weak refers to less than 10). Furthermore, before education 43.1% of scores were fair (10-14), as opposed to 60/4% after education. High scores (more than 15) were 6/55% before education which reached to 17% after education. The findings showed a significant difference between the knowledge scores before and after education (P<0.0001). With respect to taking baths during menstruation, results were different before and after education, with 62/7% of students not taking baths before education and 25/3% bathing after education. The rate of genital washing during menstruation was different in before and after education (71/7% vs. 50/1%). Conclusion: Education has had a positive effect on the knowledge and practices of students, but high percentages of students were found to be weak in health activities. It is important to better knowledge in this area, and this study's findings show that other factors such as culture and other's recommendations (specially by mothers) can be influential in sexual health practices. Education programs should therefore be widespread in girls' schools and in society/families (mothers) in general.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:34Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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