2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163959
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is Sex Ratio a Sentinel Indicator of Health?
Author(s):
Jandu, Barinder
Author Details:
Barinder Jandu, Student, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: bjandu@gmail.com
Abstract:
Introduction: The ratio of male to female births, or sex ratio, has shown to vary between populations, and over time. Although reasons for this fluctuation are still unclear, this presentation will examine whether the changing sex ratio is a sentinel indicator of health, in that it signals changes in potentially avoidable factors, such as environmental or genetic factors. Purpose: This presentation will examine the changing sex ratio in terms of its implications for developed and developing countries, where sex ratios are changing at dissimilar rates. Through a review of current literature, factors which are thought to be responsible for changes in sex ratio will be discussed. Results: This poster presentation will examine issues that arise from sex ratio data and demonstrate that in developed countries, sex ratio may be used as a sentinel health indicator for environmental factors. In developing countries, sex ratio is a less reliable indicator of health due to cultural factors. Cultural values such as sex preference, combined with attempts to limit population growth, such as the one-child policy in China, have a demonstrably larger effect on sex ratio than environmental factors alone. Conclusion: Factors affecting sex ratio differ significantly between developed and developing countries, and must be better understood before measures can be taken to address changes in sex ratios. To determine the long-term impact of environmental factors on sex ratio, future studies should recruit larger populations with a greater follow-up period that covers the spectrum of female reproductive years. Social attitudes towards females, as well as population control measures currently in place in certain developing countries must also be modified. Left unchecked, dramatic changes the sex ratio may irrevocably alter the social stability of future generations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs Sex Ratio a Sentinel Indicator of Health?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorJandu, Barinderen_US
dc.author.detailsBarinder Jandu, Student, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: bjandu@gmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163959-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The ratio of male to female births, or sex ratio, has shown to vary between populations, and over time. Although reasons for this fluctuation are still unclear, this presentation will examine whether the changing sex ratio is a sentinel indicator of health, in that it signals changes in potentially avoidable factors, such as environmental or genetic factors. Purpose: This presentation will examine the changing sex ratio in terms of its implications for developed and developing countries, where sex ratios are changing at dissimilar rates. Through a review of current literature, factors which are thought to be responsible for changes in sex ratio will be discussed. Results: This poster presentation will examine issues that arise from sex ratio data and demonstrate that in developed countries, sex ratio may be used as a sentinel health indicator for environmental factors. In developing countries, sex ratio is a less reliable indicator of health due to cultural factors. Cultural values such as sex preference, combined with attempts to limit population growth, such as the one-child policy in China, have a demonstrably larger effect on sex ratio than environmental factors alone. Conclusion: Factors affecting sex ratio differ significantly between developed and developing countries, and must be better understood before measures can be taken to address changes in sex ratios. To determine the long-term impact of environmental factors on sex ratio, future studies should recruit larger populations with a greater follow-up period that covers the spectrum of female reproductive years. Social attitudes towards females, as well as population control measures currently in place in certain developing countries must also be modified. Left unchecked, dramatic changes the sex ratio may irrevocably alter the social stability of future generations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:37Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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