2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163960
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA) Perceptions and Dietary Iron Intake
Author(s):
Jarrah, Samiha; Halabi, Jehad; Bond, A. Elaine
Author Details:
Samiha Jarrah, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Department of Clinical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing-University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan, email: dr_jehadhalabi@yahoo.com; Jehad Halabi; A. Elaine Bond
Abstract:
Purpose: To determine Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA) perceptions and iron dietary practices of Jordanian pregnant women and young women. IDA affects 60% of the world's pregnant women, with associated maternal deaths, premature births, and low birth weights. Design: Pilot study, descriptive quantitative questionnaire. Methods: Following IRB approval from the University of Jordan, two Ministry of Health Clinics, and two schools, the questionnaire was administered to 271 participants: 206 high school female students, 65 pregnant women in two clinics, and two schools, the first in a suburb of Amman, and another in a rural area in Jordan. Chi-Square analysis revealed statistically significant differences (p = < 0.05). Results: The sample can identify foods containing iron, but lack appropriate iron intake, due to eating habits and finances. Over 50% report daily symptoms of IDA, including dizziness, fatigue, depression, headaches, and loss of concentration and memory. Conclusions: There are differences in IDA perceptions and iron-related dietary practices, based on location, finances, resources, education, and position (pregnant women or young women). Culturally sensitive intervention research, which addresses education, temporary supplementation, and adequate income for dietary modification and long-term iron supplementation to prevent IDA, is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIron Deficiency Anemia (IDA) Perceptions and Dietary Iron Intakeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJarrah, Samihaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHalabi, Jehaden_US
dc.contributor.authorBond, A. Elaineen_US
dc.author.detailsSamiha Jarrah, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Department of Clinical Nursing, Faculty of Nursing-University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan, email: dr_jehadhalabi@yahoo.com; Jehad Halabi; A. Elaine Bonden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163960-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To determine Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA) perceptions and iron dietary practices of Jordanian pregnant women and young women. IDA affects 60% of the world's pregnant women, with associated maternal deaths, premature births, and low birth weights. Design: Pilot study, descriptive quantitative questionnaire. Methods: Following IRB approval from the University of Jordan, two Ministry of Health Clinics, and two schools, the questionnaire was administered to 271 participants: 206 high school female students, 65 pregnant women in two clinics, and two schools, the first in a suburb of Amman, and another in a rural area in Jordan. Chi-Square analysis revealed statistically significant differences (p = < 0.05). Results: The sample can identify foods containing iron, but lack appropriate iron intake, due to eating habits and finances. Over 50% report daily symptoms of IDA, including dizziness, fatigue, depression, headaches, and loss of concentration and memory. Conclusions: There are differences in IDA perceptions and iron-related dietary practices, based on location, finances, resources, education, and position (pregnant women or young women). Culturally sensitive intervention research, which addresses education, temporary supplementation, and adequate income for dietary modification and long-term iron supplementation to prevent IDA, is warranted.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:38Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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